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where to get 5160 thinner than 1/4"?


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Hi everybody, does anyone know of a place that sells 5160 thinner than 1/4".  It seems that almost every place I check has 1/4" as the thinnest.  I did find one place that had it at 13/64" .203", but you had to buy the whole 20' stick.  I'd like to find some 1/8" or 3/16" if possible.  

Thanks

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I don't know of any source. As I'm sure you know, 5160 is often used for leaf springs, so I think 1/4" is about as thin as it is usually produced.  If anyone would have it thinner it would be Aldo, but I just checked and .250" is his thinnest too.

 

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So Glenn, since you just started making knives and your profile does not indicate Bladesmithing or Blacksmithing I assume that you do not forge but are doing stock removal.  If you forged you could make the .25 stock any thickness you want.  .23 is not all that much thinner than .25.  As you do the stock removal to make a blade you will quickly get down to the thickness that you want.  You could find some timber bandsaw blades, they are not 5160 but are probably either L6 or 15N20, good blade material.

Let me know if I can help you.

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McMaster-Carr has .214" thick 5160 in various lengths, but that's the thinnest they've got. That being said, it is hot rolled so by the time you knock the scale off you'll end up loosing a few thousandths...

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What Jerrod said. I can't think of anything 5160 does much better than 80CrV2 and the latter has some considerable advantages.

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Thanks for the suggestions.

Yes, im just doing stock removal for now. 

What are the advantages of 80CrV2? 

Will 80CrV2 hold up to being flexed? I want to make a knife for my son that's in Idaho. He loves to hunt Elk, so I need a steel that will stay sharp and put up with some abuse.   Be able to split a brisket and still be able to skin and debone without having to be touched up constantly. ..

Edited by Glenn Larsen
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http://www.alabamadamascussteel.com/1-8-x-1-1-4-5160-bar-stock/

http://www.admiralsteel.com/shop/

Not personally used either sources.  Admiral is well known.   

Otherwise a good grinder and some cheap calipers ? :)

I'll let the pro's tell you about 80crv2.     Are you doing your own heat treatment ?

Edited by Bruno
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80CrV2 is simple to heat treat using basic equipment and looking for decalescence. The vanadiun gives a nice buffer, by pinning the grain boundaries of the carbon, so if you over heat it a bit the grain doesnt grow on you.it is very tough steel and, unlike 5160, which is a spring steel repurposed, 80CrV2 is designed as a blade steel from the get go. IIRC Mora if Sweden uses it for their carbon steel blades and Case is using it in their new Winkler collaboration . 

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Most Everything that I've read on it is positive. 

The only negative is some people are getting a thick decarb zone.  So ill just have to plan on it cleaning up thinner. 

I ordered 3 4' sticks of various thickness and width from NJSB 

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As mentionned on another thread, 80CrV2 does not require soaking at temp. It seems a lot of people do soak it though and it's probably why they end up with so much decarb. ATP-641 would certainly help in that department should you want to soak it anyway.

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