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Jon Bishop

Anvil reconditioning?

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Would it ruin an anvil face if you just dressed up a 2” section of the edge by welding? The pictures highlight the area I want to fix. I plan on using 8018 c3 rod to build up. The anvil is a 196# Peter Wright. I’ve been using for two years and I really want to put a bit of good edge on it. Thanks for any input.

957F2C17-A489-4086-96B0-127025AAF874.jpeg

9A4A2519-1ADE-4EE0-B45F-4D689B80182C.jpeg

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I forgot to add that this is my first post. I am a beginner/amature. I have been forging for about 9 years. I am a member of a local blacksmiths guild. I am a welder by trade and I think I'll be good with a localized heat treat. 300 degrees. But I have been lurking this site for about 9 years. So I was hoping someone with more heat treating exprience could chime in. Thanks.

Also, why does my post have a star instead of a black dot?

Edited by Jon Bishop
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It has a star if you have posted in the thread.  http://www.anvilmag.com/smith/anvilres.htm is THE article about anvil repair.  Peter Wrights are a steel-faced wrought iron body, so keep that in mind.  Wrought hates arc welding.  I usually don't recommend anvil repairs, but since you are a welder by trade just follow exactly what that article says, rod selection and all, and it ought to work.  That said, That particular anvil might be helped with just a little careful cleanup with an angle grinder and a 120-grit flap disc.

Welcome aboard, by the way!  

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Just a suggestion, but if all you are after is a sharp corner edge to work with

you may think about making a block of 4140 with a post welded in to fit your hardy hole, I use a piece 2"x2"

on my anvil but you can use whatever size you need per project, no risk to the surface hardness that way.

And as well welcome to the forum..........................B)

 

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Yes, I have read that same article. I was hoping a localized heat treat would work on a smaller spot. I really don't want to weld on it. Clifford, that is a great idea. Don't know why I didn't think of it. I think I'll try that. Thanks for the replys.

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A piece of forklift tine would work great for a hardy tool with sharp edges. I have plans on making one for my old German production anvil but I was going to make mine a dual purpose with indentations for rivet heads.

Edited by Jeremy Blohm

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I’m thinking of putting this in the old automatic hacksaw, then attaching some 1”x1” stock to it. It’s a side roller bearing from a railcar.

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A hardy tool can be made of mild, most of the time.  The steel you are striking on it is hot, so it's much softer than the material the hardy tool is made from.  You could do all of that, or you could just find a block of mild, weld a shank on it and you'd be done.  Unless you're doing production work on it, it will last a long time.

 

Geoff

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What Geoff said.  Plus that bearing is probably 52100, which means it will eat your power hacksaw blades for lunch and then crack when you weld a shank on it.  B)  

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Alan and Geoff are both right on the money, I had some 4140 on hand and used it , but mild will

work fine for that. As for the bearing stock use it for blade material ........................B)

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Thanks for all the advice. I have some 1-1/4” plate that I think would be good. I’m thinking two piece construction with one piece with intregal hardy and another piece of 1-1/4” welded to it . I made a rough sketch. Please let me know what you think.

Jon

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