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Kenneth Mauldin

I think I bought the wrong burner

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Hello everyone..Long time member but just recently started forging.Over the summer I built a small 1 burner forge.Iined it with 2inch kao wool.Then coated it with kast o light..then painted on metorike(sure I'm spelling that wrong)

 

I bought a burner off amazon its called geode g2 stainless..I thought it would be good and was a decent price.It came with a 30 psi regulator gauge and 4th hose.

 

I am trying to get it tuned.I have a blue flame and it sounds strong like a jet.However I cant get the metal any hotter then a bright orange .I am not sure if my burner placement is in a bad location I tried to put it on a tangent.I have the burner flush with the kast o light.

 

Any suggestioms and advice..either I am doing something wrong or I been had and got the wrong burner..Here are some photos.Thank you all in advance that reply.

Screenshot_2018-09-16-21-35-31.png

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Photo of the forge? Lots of things could be going on here.

What PSI are you running? How big is the forge? It might just be a volume issue. You say "small" but what is that is cubic inches or feet? Is the burner body a 3/4" pipe? The ad says the end of the burner is 1-3/8", but that is the piece that fits over the pipe body. The body doesn't look very long either. I have found that short bodies don't burn quite as hot as longer ones. There is a point of diminishing return to that. I think somewhere around 8 inches works well for a 3/4 inch body.

Bright orange should be OK for general forging and normalizing. How hot are you aiming for?

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13 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

Photo of the forge? Lots of things could be going on here.

What PSI are you running? How big is the forge? It might just be a volume issue. You say "small" but what is that is cubic inches or feet? Is the burner body a 3/4" pipe? The ad says the end of the burner is 1-3/8", but that is the piece that fits over the pipe body. The body doesn't look very long either. I have found that short bodies don't burn quite as hot as longer ones. There is a point of diminishing return to that. I think somewhere around 8 inches works well for a 3/4 inch body.

Bright orange should be OK for general forging and normalizing. How hot are you aiming for?

Thank you for the reply.My appolgizes I thought I listed that information but I must have forgotten to.

 

I had to run the forge at 20psi to get a bright orange.

I was under the impression I needed to forge at a bright yellow..Granted I am very new it just seems the metal takes a while to move at bright orange.It might just be user error.

 

Ah shoot ima have to go re measure and get the cubic feet ..Ill upload a photo.Not that this tell you the cubic feet but from end to end my forge is 9inches

0915181833.jpg

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It looks like the burner is not centered so the flame may be restricted.  The end of the burner should be back in the casting about 1/4".

Let me know if I can help you again.

 

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21 minutes ago, Wayne Coe said:

It looks like the burner is not centered so the flame may be restricted.  The end of the burner should be back in the casting about 1/4".

Let me know if I can help you again.

 

Thank you wayne I will make some adjustments and we shall see what happena

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I don't know what the lighting is in your shop, but in dim light, yellow is what I forge-weld at, bright orange is more my forging heat. The background light is important- if it's bright orange in daylight you may be almost burning the steel.

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53 minutes ago, Al Massey said:

I don't know what the lighting is in your shop, but in dim light, yellow is what I forge-weld at, bright orange is more my forging heat. The background light is important- if it's bright orange in daylight you may be almost burning the steel.

Thank you for the advice.If bright orange normally blade forging temp then I am good.I just thought I had to get it to a bright yellow so if its a bright orange then that's cool.That's just unexperience on my end

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It looks like the burner is choked down to me: The air holes are covered so there is not much air flow for the gas to burn with. Try changing absolutely nothing except the choke sleeve position: move it towards the forge and uncover more holes to get more air in.

See what happens and let us know.

If you can, take photos in the dark. The most useful shot is often one across the mouth of the forge to show how much Dragons Breath there is, and what colour it is: In daylight, the DB flame does not show particularly well and digital cameras tend to do strange things to the white balance so that the flame colour in the photo is not the actual colour.

Taking a tight shot directly into a forge can be completely useless because the camera will adjust the colour and a real dull red will look in a photo just like a real bright orange in another photo.

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Looking at that photo, never mind measuring that forge, you should be good with that one burner. Everyone here has already touched on the salient points. Get the tip of the burner just inside the refractory. This is not so much for better heat as it is for preserving the steel of the burner end. Get that thing into a dim light so you can really see what color is happening. That photo looks like the inside of the forge is almost white. Tim is also right about the air/fuel mix. It looks like you are not adding enough air, especially at 20 psi, which is quite high for that size and a single burner. You can probably reduce that by at last half and add more air to the mix and get the same or higher temps (saves fuel too!)

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Thank you all for the replies.They make sense and I feel retarded for not thinking of them on my own lol.I will get some photos tonight on the dark!Simce I used a old propane tank that was almost empty I got a new tank.I seen a YouTube video saying that maybe the propane tank didn't have enough volume or pressure of its old.

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I have a forge similar in size.  If I put cold metal in a cold forge and light it, it will take several minutes to come up to forging temp.  The bigger the metal, the longer it will take.

Once the forge is up to temp, I can put some cold 1/4"x1.5" stockin there and have it up to forging temp in just a few minutes.  Probably less than 3 or 4, but I haven't timed it.

If I am hammering on the metal, and put it into the hot forge as it cools down to "Red", it will be back up to yellow orange in less than a minute.  (Probably closer to 30 seconds for something 1/4"x1.5")

It probably take 10 to 15 minutes before my forge is fully up to temperature, but it starts putting out useful heat after just a few minutes.

I'm guessing on these times, so take them with a grain of salt!

 

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My ribbon burner gets to forge welding heat in 7 minutes with a 21 layer billet. Our 3-burner venturi forge (NC Tools Daddy) gets to forging heat in about the same time for most 1/2" round or square stock my wife uses

Edited by Joshua States

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