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3rd Century Roman Double Fuller Spatha


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Here is a 3rd Century Roman Double Fuller Spatha I created for a Museum.  This hilt has 25 different pieces including, African Black Ebony, African Mahogany, Premium White Holly, and Brass.

The Brass Rings are hand cast in brass with the lost wax method of casting.

Everything is hand made right here in my shop.

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22 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

Spathas were originally a weapon for Roman mounted troops.  In later times they also made their way to the infantry.

Doug

Thanks for the clarification Doug!  I knew it was the spatha that was hugely influential on the Viking sword, and eventually Medieval swords.

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Hello Wes... 

Yes the Spatha was originally a Cavalry / Equestrian Sword.  IN the First Century the variations were on the thinner side.  In the later part of the first Century the Legionary foot Soldiers sword / Gladius was of the Pompeii Style.  Going into the 2nd -3rd Centuries, the Spatha replaced the Pompeii.  There were many variations of the Spatha blades in length and blade geometry.  They had the traditional midrib and also multiple fullers.  Transitional sword?   Yes indeed!  I am currently researching 2nd-5th Century Roman Swords... More to come in the near future.

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I don't know how directly the spatha influenced the Viking sword.  Earlier spatha may have influenced the migration era swords that influenced the Viking swords or maybe Celtic swords may have influenced both.  Try reading Ewart Oakeshott's The Archaeology of Weapons, Arms and Armour from Prehistory to the Age of Chivalry if want to do a little reading on the history and development of swords.  I'm sure Amazon has it and it's not expensive.

Doug

Edited by Doug Lester
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16 hours ago, Patrick B. P. said:

Hello Wes... 

Yes the Spatha was originally a Cavalry / Equestrian Sword.  IN the First Century the variations were on the thinner side.  In the later part of the first Century the Legionary foot Soldiers sword / Gladius was of the Pompeii Style.  Going into the 2nd -3rd Centuries, the Spatha replaced the Pompeii.  There were many variations of the Spatha blades in length and blade geometry.  They had the traditional midrib and also multiple fullers.  Transitional sword?   Yes indeed!  I am currently researching 2nd-5th Century Roman Swords... More to come in the near future.

Thanks for the info Patrick!  I knew that it was eventually adopted by the infantry.  I am looking forward to hearing and seeing more.

 

15 hours ago, Doug Lester said:

I don't know how directly the spatha influenced the Viking sword.  Earlier spatha may have influenced the migration era swords that influenced the Viking swords or maybe Celtic swords may have influenced both.  Try reading Ewart Oakeshott's The Archaeology of Weapons, Arms and Armour from Prehistory to the Age of Chivalry if want to do a little reading on the history and development of swords.  I'm sure Amazon has it and it's not expensive.

Doug

I have read that Roman spathas were adapted from Celtic swords used by Roman Auxiliary. I think that I used the wrong word with influenced.  I should have used descended to be more accurate.  Thanks for the correction.

I have Oakeshott's "Records of the Medieval Sword" but thanks for the other recommendation.  I just may pick that up and add it to the library.

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