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Gerhard

Knife Collections?

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Do you collect knives?

Custom and/or production?

Fixed and/or folding?   

Do you occasionally keep your own knives? (more for collecting, I assume we all use our own knives...)

Disregarding the wonderful swords & stuff, and working from the assumption all makers want their knives to be used, what's your general take on collecting?

 

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I collected knives as a child, 90% got stolen when I was about 15.

Several years ago I was going through a rough spot, and I found the will to survive exhibited in survival tv shows interesting......attractive.  During this time the knife obsession was re-awakened. Unfortunately I had some disposable income and I indulged in some retail therapy...........

The most expensive is my only custom knife, made by my mentor and a 40th birthday gift from me to me.  No regrets.

I do have regrets about my next four most expensive knives, mostly because they are very good users, not collectible at all, and now they'll never be used......and they could've been another belt grinder....

As I get older my dislike of.........stuff..........grows, I'm starting to realize what a burden possessions can be.

I have more Mora knives than you can use in a life time, but they are so good and so cheap they bring me joy.  The Chinese folders I have were also not a lot of money, but looking back I'd trade them for one or two good Spydercos.......my favourite by a mile.

 

I know a knife is good if I want to keep it, but I sell them because the only two fun things about a knife is making it and using it!......IMHO

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I kind of know what you mean, except I never had the money to get serious about it.  I have an accumulation of cheap pocketknives from my teen years, nothing great or terribly collectible, and one possibly collectible Case skinner.  Not an expensive thing at all.  Not having the money is how I ended up making stuff, oddly enough.  I wanted a black powder muzzle-loading rifle, and back in the 1980s a CVA kit was cheap.  Like $50 cheap.  I saved and saved, bought one, finished it out,  shot it for a while, and realized I liked building it better than owning it.  Enter college and graduate school, and ten years later I started accumulating smithing equipment.  I didn't know what I wanted to make, I just knew I wanted to make stuff.  Then I decided maybe it would be nice to have a good sword instead of cheap India-made Viking-looking thing...  

Twenty years later, here I am!  :lol:  Still not much money, only the one belt grinder, but over 300 tomahawks and axes of all descriptions, five or six swords, maybe 30 knives, and three more flintlocks produced, along with untold hooks, a few coat racks, candlesticks, etc.  And I don't have any of it except for a candlestand, a coat rack, and a set of andirons and fire tools.  I like making stuff, not owning stuff.  My only collecting weakness is antique pottery, an occupational hazard of being a historic archaeologist.  It's just so nice to see whole pots sometimes...:rolleyes:  Although I have called a halt to that too, no more room.

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Tools are my nemesis one is too many, and a million aint enough.....!!!

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Same here!

I started out collecting when I was very little. My grandfather was a huge inspiration. He  gave me a dulled Swiss army knife when I was 5. He made me a tomahawk when I was pretty young. I remember it well. A round flat river rock wedged into a stick tied up with electrical tape with fencing ribbon for decoration.... I broke it just about immediately. I was always carving stuff, or trying to make furniture. I wasn't allowed to use power tools so my arms became overly developed at a young age. Looked like Popeye with a big head. I remember driving wood screws in with a screwdriver, using a dull old ripsaw to crosscut wood, and "drilling" holes with the tip of a pocket knife. 

My other grandfather was a farmer and showed me how to use more hand tools to fix old equipment and other hand tools. I always joked that his favorite phrase was "hit it with a hammer" whether it be a seized part, stuck pin, rusted bolt, or anything really; "hit it with a hammer!". He'd pay me $40 a week for helping him on the farm and I'd spend it on knives, or whatever tools I thought I needed.  

Everything I've ever made I've given away, sold, or destroyed. Well, I keep what tools I make And that's about it. 

So I've got a handful of Case knives, a couple old timers, a KaBar, a swiss army knife (somewhere) a really old Hopalong Cassidy knife, and a few miscellaneous junky knives. I had a benchmade balisong I got on a trade until I found out how much it was worth. I sold it. I woulda just got into trouble with it anyway; too fun to play with. 

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I collect now and plan to do it for as long as I can. Right now I have 8 planning to get the ninth soon. 

They are all production knives. 

Spyderco 

Kabar 

gerber

bestech

and something  else I can’t remember..

and when I start forging knives I plan to collect some, but eventually I want to make an EDC company. 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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@Alan Longmire I would say I grew up fortunate middle class, but my parents taught us the value of money. 

Also, at some point my parents realised that I took everything apart, I can remember I disliked the plastic windows of Matchbox cars, they had to be ripped out.  By about 11 or 12 my only toys were my Daisy, my slingshot and everything is my Dad's garage.....

Made hollow handle "survival knives" by flattening a galvanized tent post and fashioning a "blade" from the flattened bit. 

Made miniature Bowie knives from mild steel flat bar, I still have my best one....

And the the thing that proved prophetic.....I hammered out little swords from 6" nails, I can remember several clearly, but no idea where they ended up...........

 

@Zeb Camper I guess grandfathers can see the itch, the only one of my grandfathers I ever knew also gave me two of his beat-up knives....real treasures.

@Conner Michaux IIRC you are quite young?  My advice, stop now.  Pass up 10 knives you feel like buying and buy that one good Spyderco you can and will use.  Not just Spyderco, just study and learn from the best.....

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I do collect my own historical reproductions. I'm pretty much an addicted collector, with a strong urge to get something new and nice once in a while. While I can't completely stop that, I can limit the effectiveness with regard to accumulating things. Making stuff I found to be better then just buying stuff. I keep my tools at a minimum (my biggest tools are a small drill press and an angle grinder, and those were purchased when after years of holding off getting them, I still found they would be put to good use). Earlier I kept buying materials though even without projects for it in mind, but now I either use what I have, or buy if I can't finish a project without. In the mean time I've offloaded a fair amount of old collections. I live in a house the size of a shoebox on purpose, because it forces me to strongly consider if I really want to spend the space, as it means something else has to go. Now I share that same shoebox with my girlfriend and daughter, so my available space has been limited drastically since, and will keep shrinking in the future. But, I do have a nice collection of reproductions, which since I made them have a special meaning. They don't take up much space, so they can stay (which my girlfriend agrees with b.t.w. ^_^). Having a small amount of space means that what I do own are things carefully selected and of more of value to me then if I just had unlimited space to fill up.  

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P.s. I do admire your attitude towards owning only what you use. I strive towards that, but don't have the personal strength to live by it. 

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10 hours ago, Gerhard said:

@Alan Longmire I would say I grew up fortunate middle class, but my parents taught us the value of money. 

I didn't mean to imply I grew up poor, my family was also fortunate middle class (grocers, teachers, etc.).  But my parents also taught me the value of money and the discipline to work for it, which has been a most helpful thing to know.  If I wanted (not needed) something, I learned I had to work for it.  I started bagging groceries and stocking shelves at my grandfather's grocery store at age seven, mostly because I wanted that $14 Camillus Ka-Bar in the knife case.  I got $0.25/hour, so that knife cost me 350 hours of labor.  Basically the entire summer of 1977.  I still have that knife, rather the worse for wear.  :lol: And even if mint in the box it'd still only be worth the equivalent of $14 in 1977 money, about $60:rolleyes:.  But man, I wanted that knife!  

But, once I was old enough to get an actual job and be paid properly, I never looked back.  First year of college was scholarship, but I paid my own way from there on.  Makes me feel for the kids I see now who are $100K in debt with student loans but don't know how or are too proud to work a menial job to pay it off, or to pay for that iPhone X, or the car, etc.  

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For as long as I can remember my pocket money was R2.50 a month, and at the toy store there were these model antique cars that cost R7.50........3 months

I still have them, but unfortunately not the knives that at some point became every birthday or xmas gift....or the thing bought as soon as I'd saved enough.

Friday afternoon after school we'd go to town on our bicycles and leave our grubby finger prints on the display cases of all the gun shops, dreaming about which knife to buy next.

I only regret 2 of the stolen knives, an Okapi that was still German manufactured, and a little fixed blade that was the sharpest knife I'd ever experienced, but considering where I bought it,  should've been crap.  I clearly remember the black leather sheath was the best quality in my collection, the tip was a needle, metal bolster and IIRC a black synthetic material of some kind.  The whole construction was very solid, and like I said razor sharp.  I bought it at a stall at the Windhoek Show, I guess what you'd call a fair, covers agriculture and industry right down to beer and bratwurst and toffee apples and stalls selling shite meant to empty parents' wallets....for a whole week.

What bothers me to this day is who made that knife, what was the steel.......I don't even want it back, just NEED to know that! :lol:

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