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Zeb Camper

Faux sheer steel

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Well, here it is. I only have a tiny amount of steel on the edge, I think because I forged it so close to shape, but it's there. Now to see if it hardens. If I did this style blade again, I would define the spine to tang area before forging in the bevel so that the tang would be centered once I forged the bevel in. 20181028_183239.jpg20181028_183234.jpg

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Here's the handle... Figure I'll polish up the ol' carving skills. 

Critique is valued as always. I'm trying to do it justice. 20181028_210620.jpg

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This is awesome.  Cant wait to see the handle.

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Nice! I always forge the step from spine to tang first, then bevel, then the step from edge to tang. That makes it the easiest to get the tang in the center. 

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P.s. I've also found that even with wrought, you do get quite a bit of carbon migration from the edge into the wrought. On the smallest knives, pretty much all of the wrought hardened along with the edge. 

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Just an update... It worked!!!! Hardened up good. Now to make a ton more of this "sheer steel" 

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Looks pretty close to the real stuff!  Just remember to spell it "shear."  ;)

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14 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Looks pretty close to the real stuff!  Just remember to spell it "shear."  ;)

:lol: I do good just to pronounce things right!

Hey, I have a question that I should know but don't ... Is 350° the lowest temperature that you can temper at? This stuff skated a file, but I know its bound to be fairly soft. Would hate to over temper it. 

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You can temper as low as you want, but I think it doesn't really do a lot until 325 or so.  That's the thing about homemade steel, everything is seat-of-the-pants. The great thing is, once you figure out how to play with it, you can figure out how to work almost any non-stainless alloy.  Especially when you get up to smelting your own.  Things will get interesting fast!

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Thanks!

I'm positive that at one point or another I'll be smelting my own. I'll try it again this year before the ground freezes up too bad. I think I'll just make a furnace out of clay. 

I guess I'll need to make some charcoal first. 

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Looking great Zeb! It's making my hands itch to grab the hammer and start forging again. One of these days, when I can spare the time... :)

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Well, here's the hickory handle all carved up. I got the idea of the antler part from a post on here by Emiliano Carrillo. Thanks for the inspiration man! 

Edited by Zeb Camper
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Looks awesome 

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One thing I never had the the patients for was carving. I tip my hat to you guys that do it.

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8 hours ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

One thing I never had the the patients for was carving. I tip my hat to you guys that do it.

 The secret to success is a strong background in drawing and a little  patience as you said. It didn't take too long though. I hogged most of the wood out with the Dremel and then refined it all with hand chiseles. I was actually hanging out with my buddy while he was changing the oil in his truck. I had the drawing on the knife and the rough Dremel work done by the time he had the oil changed. Finished it up later last night. I bet it only took 3 hours total. And that's including the burning with a candle (well I used a lighter this time) to get the fuzzies off and sanding the high spots for contrast. 

It passes the time, I'll probably carve the rear of the handle just because. I guess at some point I'll sell this thing... If anyone will even want it.

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It's going down!

Here are some picks of the metal we started with and the bar forged from it. Wrought iron wagon tire, and w2. I haven't thought of a use for the 1075 yet, but it may come in handy. 

The goal is to make a big beautiful langsax. I got my buddy to swing a sledge for a while, and I hammered for a while on it too. I got the burnt up motor on the power hammer to do a little work as well. We got the billet for the twisted core bars almost ready to be twisted. Next I'll make the "shear steel" for the edge and do a san mai just like the previous blade. 

So the composition from the spine to edge will be: wrought, twisted bar, twisted bar, san mai. 

 

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Edited by Zeb Camper

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This is going to be a good one. I can't wait to see what you do here.  

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