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AndyB

Okay Shop Safety Question....

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  I'm still trying to get fairly comfortable with my forge, how ever I haven't gotten comfortable enough as of yet to bring it inside underneath the roof of the carport.  Which leads me to one question.  My forge sits at roughly 20 to 24 inches off the ground.  I'm about 5 foot 9 or 69 inches in height or 1.75 meters, for those of you across the pond.  To put it simply the roof of my carport in some spots is only 6 inches above my head, at the highest point it is a foot over my head.  I can paint the ceiling with a paint brush quite comfortably if that makes any sense.  How ever that brings up the question.  Since I am running coal I can see how much heat that comes off it when I'm forging and running the fan.  So am I even safe to forge underneath that low of a carport?  I am asking because I honestly don't want to let a bit of rain stop me from running the forge but I would prefer to do it safely, I only worry about the amount of heat rising from the forge that would hit the carport roof which is yes made out of plywood and the metal roofing tin.  Thanks in advance.

Edited by AndyB

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Since it is an open carport it should be fine.  I've run coal forges under nylon pop-up shelters with no problems.  If you are really worried, a simple sheet of thin steel or even aluminum flashing mounted an inch or so off the ceiling will be an effective heat shield.

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2 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Since it is an open carport it should be fine.  I've run coal forges under nylon pop-up shelters with no problems.  If you are really worried, a simple sheet of thin steel or even aluminum flashing mounted an inch or so off the ceiling will be an effective heat shield.

Okay thanks Alan, I just am one of those guys that would rather be safe than sorry you know.

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A single layer of 5/8" Type X gypsum wallboard (drywall) is good for 30 minutes of burn through time with direct exposure to flame. A layer of that on the ceiling (3 feet above your forge) will also effectively fire proof the plywood.

Oh and buy a fire extinguisher anyway. Keep it handy. I have 3 of them in our shop, placed strategically.

Edited by Joshua States

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8 minutes ago, Joshua States said:

A single layer of 5/8" Type X gypsum wallboard (drywall) is good for 30 minutes of burn through time with direct exposure to flame. A layer of that on the ceiling (3 feet above your forge) will also effectively fire proof the plywood.

Oh and buy a fire extinguisher anyway. Keep it handy. I have 3 of them in our shop, placed strategically.

Got a fire extinguisher I always keep it in arms length when I’m forging so far I haven’t risked putting the forge under the plywood roof yet. I also keep a 5 gallon bucket of water near by as well.  

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13 minutes ago, AndyB said:

Got a fire extinguisher I always keep it in arms length when I’m forging so far I haven’t risked putting the forge under the plywood roof yet. I also keep a 5 gallon bucket of water near by as well.  

"I love this plan. I'm proud to be a part of it."

- Peter Venkman-

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Put a thermometer at the roof line and watch how hot it gets! Like Alan said since, it wide open it should be fine! That should tell you if you have a problem! I like the fire extinguisher and water bucket back-up!!

 

Here is a bit of info I pulled up!! Maybe that will make you feel more at ease!!

https://www.reference.com/science/temperature-wood-catch-fire-ad24f9902a0d4989

Edited by C Craft

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