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Kreg

W2 q's

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I'm up in Ogden, but we definitely need to have a forge hang out and do some drinking.

and might I add we have "real brine" in the salt puddle but it would make our blades smell like a yeast infection lmao.

Edited by Joe Wulvz
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HAHAHAHHAHA, I have thought about going to the GLS to get quenchant before, why make brine when you have a source so close right? 

If you guys are not aware, there are a couple active Blacksmithing / Bladesmithing groups that are local to us, PM me and ill send you the FB info them. 

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I had wanted to go to lightning forge abana conference when bear was there but I had overtime at work :S

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Yeah, I missed that one as well, Work and kid life totally rules my ability to get to hammer in's right now, thankfully my oldest is getting to the age where I can put him to work as a striker and take him with me to meetings, So I hope to be more active in the local community shortly. 



 

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Back on topic of Aldo's W2......


Here is what I was able to pull off with my first attempt at Hamon's with Aldo's W2, I bought both the 1/8th inch and the 1/4th stock at the same time, These are both forged out of the 1/4th thick stock, I suspect my lack of activity is due to the thickness I put the clay on as I went pretty thick, neither of these blades are close to the starting 1/4th thickness but I probably had at least 1/8th inch thick clay on both of them if not more... 

Also my Daughter is famous for photobombing me, She takes after her father and moves like a Ninja.... 
20181116_172426.jpg20181116_172418.jpg20181116_172354.jpg20181116_172343.jpg

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Look good.  I'll be waiting to see the finished product.

Doug

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33 minutes ago, Robert D. said:

Back on topic of Aldo's W2......


Here is what I was able to pull off with my first attempt at Hamon's with Aldo's W2, I bought both the 1/8th inch and the 1/4th stock at the same time, These are both forged out of the 1/4th thick stock, I suspect my lack of activity is due to the thickness I put the clay on as I went pretty thick, neither of these blades are close to the starting 1/4th thickness but I probably had at least 1/8th inch thick clay on both of them if not more... 

Also my Daughter is famous for photobombing me, She takes after her father and moves like a Ninja.... 
20181116_172426.jpg20181116_172418.jpg20181116_172354.jpg20181116_172343.jpg

Looks better than anything I have been able to pull off. I think I have had a few and have just failed miserably polishing them.

I am gonna break down and order some 1500 grit silica carbide or what ever that powdered abrasive is everyone uses.

What did ya quench those in....if ya dont mind me asking.

What did ya use for clay?  I have been having decent success with watered down rutlands....as far as the clay staying on.

 

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The clay I used is the 3M furnace/fireplace sealant mixed 50/50 with Cone 6 clay slip. 

Quenched them into heated Canola oil, The polishing regimen was a bit haphazard, I didnt etch till I hit 1200g, and then used Brasso on the unhardened section, and 2000g diamond powdered abrasives on the hardened section and the actual line. 

Etch process was Etch in vinegar, overpolish the line off, etch again, overpolish again, etch again in ferric, overpolish, etch in lemon juice, keep screwing them up over and over again, post here and read more, get suggestions and finally stumble on something that actually resembles what I was looking to achieve by pure luck....  

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trick to the hamon is the penetration time, the inside on the clay coating has to get REALLY hot. people like to think that it being isolated from the quench  means isolated from the heat and thats not true. you gotta really really soak your blade in heat to make sure that very back of the spine is the same temp as your blades edge. (the part thats insolated) for the best results Id say soak to a higher heat about 100 more then you want for the blades edge... let the edge cool to the temp you want and dunk it, do not remove it right away either because the heat has to dissipate through the exposed area from under the coating. that is what really gives you the sharp line and not just a two tone.

so think of it like this: there is the isolated area and a venting area for the heat, you can layer your hamon all the way out the blade edge and then relayer it in waves getting thicker to the spine. that will control how your heat escapes, and its possible to have multiple colors and lines in your hamon.

I went to CFV which doesnt take a hamon, much stronger steel though and more expensive, but I would recommend Satanite

 

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Useful link, I need to order some satanite and ITC for my propane forge before winter really sets in and I cant get to my Charcoal forge otherwise ill be taking the Winter off... 

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it is really cheap and effective, and you get more then you can readily use so its worth the price.
The website is also ABANA and ABS backed which is more then enough to say its good shit.

I use this satanite for everything from my forge lining to crucibles to steel modification using welding temps and welding like the japanese do it, to hamons. Just let it sit for a few hours then use a propane torch or a flame to cure it. it works best in different layers with different sets.

I also made a charcoal forge using layers of this satanite and Kwool.

Last year when i had a space outdoors I used a cheap brick forge with a blow drier and I basically had enough heat to relax in a snowstorm. now I live in an apartment complex and forge stuff out with a cheap propane forge i got on Ebay. so same boat, my winter forging is going to be limitted.

Edited by Joe Wulvz

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My main forge is a charcoal brick monstrosity powered by a hair dryer as well.  I just didnt think when I set it up so it gets buried under snow sliding off my roof and didnt think to move it before the weather set in this year.  I just bought a single burner propane forge to use in my garage for the winter but it only came rigidized and ive yet to fire it up because I need to line it first. 

The joys of living in Utah and only having Winter and Construction as seasons.... 

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the lining works by itself the coat just protects it, its a bit of a pain getting enough satanite to soak into the lining to make a hard lining so the outside forms a shell that can crack, you have to paint and paint tiny thin layers onto it.

I live in an apartment complex so I go walking to a field and forge there lol. I keep getting the cops called on me and then I just chill with them as they watch me forge, Iv had an officer be my striker for a brief moment too lmao. I really. really Miss using charcoal. Next year I will try to find a place where I have a yard or a garage or something.

So back to hamons, if you use this, get cheap paint foam brushes, they cost like a quarter a piece. buy alot of them, they really help for making a paper thin layer, put the first layer out to close to the blade and then coat your main layer where you want the line to be.

 

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No no they sell them in the paint isle they are the little sticks with foam on the end, thats the shit you want. Using a stick will give you little air bubbles that can strait up ×÷-+ ( had to censor myself) your day.

Ima take some pictures when i get home of some jacked hamon failures.

Edited by Joe Wulvz

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These two were like somewhere in the first 5 knives i ever made, i tried using a homemade hamon clay coat and they came off (air bubbles) during the water quench.

It does bad things to blades if the clay coat comes off.

I just kept them because i liked the shape as a template for later use. they were gathering rust so i had to gently sand them off, the hamon did take but needed an etch to be visible. (double failure lol)

also a good note that a flash camera in the dark will expose flaws you cannot see with the naked eye.

15441916778821837447883.jpg

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154419200921782687746.jpg

Edited by Joe Wulvz

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Today marks the 2 week anniversary since I ordered my w2. My package went unscanned by fed ex for over a week.

Just thinking out loud a bit......isnt what cracks the edge the fact that it cools so much faster than the spine?

I had a piece of 1095 that I tried to water quench so many times it changed the blade shape. lol

The steel I have coming is only 1/8". I planned on doing the majority of the grinding after ht and quench.

Seems a like I may have a better chance of success doing all the grinding post quench....any thoughts on that?

I may even experiment with a clayless edge quench.

fedphuck.jpg

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33 minutes ago, Kreg said:

Just thinking out loud a bit......isnt what cracks the edge the fact that it cools so much faster than the spine?

Kind of.  Quench cracks come from differential cooling caused warping, and the crack happens when said warping is happening when the steel is too brittle (untempered martensite) to accommodate that warping.  

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when I first started off with my teacher he made me forge out bar stock as well as a knife every day and watch quench it, while working on a sword. I had to manage the sword we would be working on as well as the knife, and I used to forge both weekend days every week. 8 knives a month.

so having an excess of quenched knives they got used for steel edge testing against other steels (that is razor edge slammed against razor edge). Very very harsh method of teaching but I learned.

as far grinding with water quenches goes, in my experience it doesnt hurt to forge the pre taper, grind it smooth, forge the bevels, grind off the chucks, blade edging shouldnt be sharp during the quench just close to it. another thing that helps is rounding the spine and bevels off and doing your fullers if you have them, the shapes will stop warps. (that is one of the original purposes of a fuller)

Edited by Joe Wulvz
grammar fix
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