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Joël Mercier

Nakiri

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Here's my latest 

1095 steel with mustard patina, a first for me :lol:

3/32" thick spine, 6.5" edge 2" wide.

Bird's-eye maple and vulcanized fiber shims. 

Edit: my photos were quite bad so I reworked them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Joël Mercier
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How do you get that patina? Cover it in mustard and let it sit? Great looking knife!

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2 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

How do you get that patina? Cover it in mustard and let it sit? Great looking knife!

Basically yes, it's really easy. I used a cotton pad and stamped a thin layer and let it dry. Cleaned and repeated once. The blade had been polished to #800 prior to the etch.

Edit: I had a photo of the the mustard layout.

IMG_20181204_120845.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier
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2 hours ago, Kreg said:

I like that handle a lot.....I am soooo bored with my handles. lol

Thanks Kreg! To be honest, I somewhat improvised on this one ^_^. I did most of the carving on the disc sander and stopped when it felt good in the hand. It is designed for mostly pinch grip.

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This is really cool effect! Actually mustards usually contain acetic acid and citic acid + salt. Probably they are the etching agents. I have never thought about using it for etching! Thakns for sharing.

I thought about some simmilar experiment; etching with water after sour(pickle) cucumbers (after natural lactic fermentation). It contains lactic acid  + salt. This liquid was known in middle Europe since middle ages (mailnly as an hangover remedy), so it could had been used for etching steel.

But it's just a foggy vision of my imagination :lol:

Anyway, when I try I show the result on the forum.

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5 minutes ago, Kris Lipinski said:

Anyway, when I try I show the result on the forum.

That would be cool, and thanks!

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42 minutes ago, Kris Lipinski said:

This is really cool effect! Actually mustards usually contain acetic acid and citic acid + salt. Probably they are the etching agents. I have never thought about using it for etching! Thakns for sharing.

I thought about some simmilar experiment; etching with water after sour(pickle) cucumbers (after natural lactic fermentation). It contains lactic acid  + salt. This liquid was known in middle Europe since middle ages (mailnly as an hangover remedy), so it could had been used for etching steel.

But it's just a foggy vision of my imagination :lol:

Anyway, when I try I show the result on the forum.

I like the look that I get with horseraddish. I have heard some strange ones....pineapple ect.

hraddish.jpg

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I like the patina, and the nice crisp lines of the handle. Nice one, Joël.

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I wondered what you were up to! Thought about messaging you. Now I see it was good things! 

I really like the patina and handle. I see those really subtle plunges too B)

It'd probably sell fast! 

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12 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

I wondered what you were up to! Thought about messaging you. Now I see it was good things! 

I really like the patina and handle. I see those really subtle plunges too B)

It'd probably sell fast! 

Thanks! And yes it is sold :rolleyes:

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what type of mustard? would you mind talking us through the process a bit? sorry, but this is pretty much the exact look im going for with a chinese style kitchen knife a client has ordered 

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2 hours ago, Ross Vosloo said:

what type of mustard? would you mind talking us through the process a bit? sorry, but this is pretty much the exact look im going for with a chinese style kitchen knife a client has ordered 

I used the cheapest yellow mustard I could find. Polished the blade to #800. Cleaned and used a cotton pad to stamp a thin layer like the photo above. Let it dry, clean and repeat till you got the desired effect.

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38 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

I used the cheapest yellow mustard I could find. Polished the blade to #800. Cleaned and used a cotton pad to stamp a thin layer like the photo above. Let it dry, clean and repeat till you got the desired effect.

awesome, thanks for the info. do you sand or buff after the patina?

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20 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

No

right, got it, thanks very much 

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I find a mustard finish appealing, both ascetically and for giving a somewhat rust resistant patina. This was a favorite finish of my recently departed mentor, Wayne Goddard. He would hand sand the blade to 600 grit in a swirled non-pattern, then apply a very light coat of yellow mustard to the blade. Wayne then used any number of items, usually his finger tips, to dob on random heavier spots of mustard on the blade. letting the blade set overnight gives a good etch. The blade looks terrible when you come back in the morning, but take heart, it's ok. Gently wash the blade with soap and hot water. Where the dobs are heavy, the blade doesn't etch as much. If the "pattern" isn't to your liking, repeat the process without removing the first attempt. I lightly heating the blade with a hot air gun and coat it with a light coat of oil (I use spray canola oil on kitchen knives). Another way to change the aspect of the finish is apply cold blue to the blade after the mustard finish is done

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I, too like how the mustard looks, but both times i tried it, it washed off after the first use.  Is there a trick to making it last?  The knives were made from 15N20 if that matters.

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10 hours ago, billyO said:

I, too like how the mustard looks, but both times i tried it, it washed off after the first use.  Is there a trick to making it last?  The knives were made from 15N20 if that matters.

That particular steel is acid resistant because of the nickel content. That's why it is used in pattern welding, etchants do not affect it nearly as much as with 10xx steels. 

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3 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

That particular steel is acid resistant because of the nickel content. That's why it is used in pattern welding, etchants do not affect it nearly as much as with 10xx steels. 

Ahhhh, of course (slapping forehead)....That's why you've been using it for your damascus for the past 3 years, billy....

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