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Olivier Petrin

Historical Sgian Dubh edge geometry

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Hello everyone,

I'm currently making a Sgian Dubh and I want to verify something before I go too far in the process.
I don't want to make a Sgian Dubh shaped knife but rather a replica. Where I need help with this is about the edge geometry.
I see all kind of edges on the Internet but historically, were they full flat, V ground or like a chisel, etc?

Thanks

 

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I would look at the Sgian Dubhs that Jake Cleland makes. Search for his posts by author. I consider him to be the resident Scots knife guru, but he shows up here sporadically.

Use the forum search tool. Type "sgian dubh" in the term, click search by author, and enter Jake Cleland. You will get a ton of hits.

 

 

Edited by Joshua States

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originally a sgian dubh was pretty much any small utility knife with a blade between 2 and 4 inches. In the 19th century they became more standardised as a part of the Victorian idea of Highland dress. I generally make them 1/8th thick, with a full convex grind to a zero edge (or with a tiny micro bevel) and a correspondingly convex distal taper, as this is close to the 19th/early 20th century examples I have examined. Unless you're copying a specific example, just do what feels right to you. The only real 'rules' are that it must be slim enough to be worn flat against the leg in the kilt hose (socks), and you should keep the blade to around 3 1/2"...

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Thank you Jake! Your answer is exactly what I was searching for. By the way, your work is stunning! I really like it.

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