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AndrewB

Knife Scales Finally....

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  So when I ordered these I apparently ordered 2.  I didn't realize that scales came in blocks of 2 lol.  OPPS oh well so I have an extra set for a second knife or in case I screw this one up.  Guess I should get drilling.  But yea the bloodwood scales were a nice choice I like the color of the wood.  But I am wondering what the best way is going to be to do this.  Should I trace out the tang of the knife onto the blocks of wood and then clamp and drill?  or should I just trace the outline of the tang on the front side of the blocks to have a line for where the tang is once I get the holes drilled out when I'm ready to sand these down?  Bloodwood does have a pretty color to it.

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Love the color of Blood wood :) 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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When I do scales, I drill the tang first, by itself.  Then I clamp on one scale and drill it through the holes in the tang, turn it over, and do the other one.  Then you can pin the scales together and shape them on the grinder, which is a must if you're going guardless.  It also gets tricky if you've tapered the tang, because you have to shim it up perpendicular to the bit to drill the holes right.  

You can also do this the hard way (sometimes that's the only way) by epoxying on one scale to the pre-drilled tang, drill the scale, then do the other one.  Lots of ways to do it.

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4 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

When I do scales, I drill the tang first, by itself.  Then I clamp on one scale and drill it through the holes in the tang, turn it over, and do the other one.  Then you can pin the scales together and shape them on the grinder, which is a must if you're going guardless.  It also gets tricky if you've tapered the tang, because you have to shim it up perpendicular to the bit to drill the holes right.  

You can also do this the hard way (sometimes that's the only way) by epoxying on one scale to the pre-drilled tang, drill the scale, then do the other one.  Lots of ways to do it.

Okay yea I've pre drilled the holes in the tang a while back.  I was jsut trying to figure the best way to drill the holes in the wood thanks.  I"ll give that a go.  I have 2 sets of scales fortunately.

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alright epoxy time lol this makes me nervous

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Prefit looks okay forgive the shotty outlines I did of the tang on roughly where it would sit in the wood.  I was surprised at how well the pins fit and fit snugly in the wood so that will be good.  Seems to fit up nicely at least.  Small downside is looks like I'll be cutting some material off with the saw after the glue is finished curing.  Not too big of a deal.  But now I'm just going to start getting the epoxy mixed good thing I got the stuff that the work time lasts for 60 minutes lol.

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So the epoxy is on, way easier than I expected.  I thought I was going to be moving slow with this but it went pretty quick.  Got everything mixed up now just hurry up and wait for it to cure another 24 hours lol.  But it's clamped and now curing.  I'm just really hoping that this works and everything is good.  I guess we'll find out in about 30 hours or so.  Well guess its back to cities skylines for now lol.  Hurry up and wait.

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8 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Lookin' good!

I'm just hoping I did it right lol.  I'll find out in about 30 hours I guess.

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Looking right. Looking tight. 

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Thanks now it's just hurry up and wait for it to cure lol.

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By the looks of it you broke the cardinal rule.......glued the scales before shaping and finishing them where they meet the blade......

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9 hours ago, Gerhard said:

By the looks of it you broke the cardinal rule.......glued the scales before shaping and finishing them where they meet the blade......

Not entirely too big of a deal lol.  I'll work around it.  This knife remember was never meant to be perfect in anyway shape or form.  Also I broke another rule, I also think I got some of the epoxy on the spine of the knife on accident as well.  I made so many mistakes with this go around not even funny.  I now know what has to be done in this process.  I've got two more to get through to learn that's shaping the scales and polishing the scales before I can move on to the next.  They should be cured enough to work on in a couple of hours.  But but mostly this knife was the learning experience knife not meant to be perfect.

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Just be careful not to over heat the pins while shaping....it will melt the epoxy and they will slide in and out.

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48 minutes ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

Just be careful not to over heat the pins while shaping....it will melt the epoxy and they will slide in and out.

Lol it may happen but I noticed when sanding them a bit with the belt sander they did not get too hot.  So I may be okay on it.  But I also may wind up cutting them off more with the hack saw at some point.  I don't want to risk with it today because of the winds and a possible power outage.  The epoxy should be cured by now lol.  Almost time to get to work on it.

Edited by AndyB

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I think I'm going to need a better belt sander lol.  That dayton Does NOT like wood at all lol.

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Not sure what kind of problems you're having but different woods act differently. Some burn very easily. Generally though, you're going to want some nice fresh sharp AO belts for wood. Using a ceramic belt that you had already been using for steel will likely just burn the wood and not cut into it very well at all.

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I made some small changes that will hopefully make things go ten times easier on the shaping and sanding.  I cut the excess brass off of the pins.  I also cut the excess wood off from the scales that wasn't needed and just in the way.  So it should be much easier to get a nice form out of the end with out having to sand away too much wood.  Seems that even with mistakes that I have made with this one it will work out.  So far what have I found out with this is that I guess the mix I bought from Ace hardware will work okay for the epoxy.  So I have my epoxy supplier now.  It held up through some test sanding and what not.  It also held up through me cutting off the excess wood with a hand saw.  So I at least know the scales are solidly bonded to the metal.

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2 minutes ago, Cody Killgore said:

Not sure what kind of problems you're having but different woods act differently. Some burn very easily. Generally though, you're going to want some nice fresh sharp AO belts for wood. Using a ceramic belt that you had already been using for steel will likely just burn the wood and not cut into it very well at all.

I did notice that with one of the belts I was using as a worn belt with the sanding.  So I had to swap it out since it was starting to burn the wood changed it out for a fresh 50 grit and it did okay.  For the most part anyway.

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I've done a bit more shaping with the belt sander, it's just rough on the wood.  This is only with 50 grit betls.  I'm amazed at how quickly sanding wood will tear up a belt lol.  Oh well.  But I think it's starting to take shape more and more and looking better.  I'm doing this slowly.  Even as it sits now it feels okay to hold in the hand.  Not very comfortable but you can hold it.  I think the final finishing sanding I'm going to do all by hand.  I think that will make it look better too.  Still trying to work out how I'm going to round the scales a bit at the top.

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For rounding the scales at the top, you could use a Dremel if you have one.:)

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A wood rasp is also nice for roughing out handles. No dust, no noise, fast removal. After the rasp I switch to files and then sand paper.

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1 minute ago, Joël Mercier said:

A wood rasp is also nice for roughing out handles. No dust, no noise, fast removal. After the rasp I switch to files and then sand paper.

I'll have to go over and pick one up I'll make a home depot run.

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I will try to hold my handle at a 45 to the belt for a couple of passes to get things started.

Then I put my blade in a wood clamp or a vise.

Then about a 1" strip of 80 grit. With both hands go straight down one hand at a time.

Kinda hard to explain......imagine an old fashion shoe shine motion.

 

Edited by Kreg Whitehead

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Take a serious look at handle geometry and ergonomics.  Somewhere on the forum us a discussion, old, about the "egg shape cross section" it is a good place and principle to begin with.

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