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Brian Dougherty

Forge Build using Anvil Fire NA Burners

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Hi all, I though I'd share some pics of the forge I just finished up using the P-75 Black Beauty Forge Burner available on Anvil Fire.  These were brought to my attention in this post:

https://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?/topic/37790-new-forge-burner-design-from-jock-dempsey-the-anvilfire-guru/

 

I needed to reline my old forge, and since I had long wished I could get a few more inches up to welding heat, this seemed like a great opportunity to try out the new burners and build a larger forge.  I started with an old forklift propane tank that a friend had given me.  I can't claim any of this design as my own as I am sure I learned how to do this from Wayne's site as well as a few others.  I also can't really claim that I did this the right way, so take my approach with a grain of salt.

The end of the tank had a 1/4" thick cast section welded in to hold all of the fittings and gauges.  This was a bit thicker than I cared to cut thought with my 120V plasma cutter so I cut around the thick section and fabbed up a new front plate with a "D" shaped hole.

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The back side has a ~4"x2" hole that I was careful to make sure the bottom edge was lined up with the bottom edge of the front hole so that I could cast a level floor.

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I found some old conduit fittings that seemed like a good start on burner holders, so I tapped a few holes for holding/adjustment screws, and  welded them onto the body.

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Then 2" of ceramic fiber "Wool" all the way around.  I used some scraps to help fill in where the floor will be.  (I cut the wool out of the back opening after this pic was taken)

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Then I cast the floor with enough Mizzou to get it brought up level with the bottoms of the openings.  After that had cured for a week, I cast more Mizzou around the walls .  I used over 15# of refractory for the job.  The end result is 17" deep and 6" wide at the bottom.

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The forge is up and running.  I'll post more pics and some results shortly.

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I set the burners at 8" on center, and that made it possible to use some standard 1/4" pipe fittings off the shelf at the local box store.  Apparently, the local store manager believes nobody uses black iron pipe for anything anymore.  They barely had any galvanized fittings.  I'm not worried about the galvanization getting hot enough to burn the zinc, but I think running gas through galvanized pipe is a "no-no".  It'll have to do for now...

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One of the other things that I didn't like about my last forge was that I never did set it up to have a proper door.  I just kept propping fire bricks in front of the opening.  I've lost track of the number of times I have accidentally bumped the "Door" pulling something out of the forge, and knocked the red hot firebrick over.  More often than not they would then fall into the slack tub which is annoying as well as a dangerous end to the firebrick.

This go around I did the usual angle iron rail with the sliding bricks.  I had some short soft bricks, so I tried using mortar to bond two pieces together large enough for a door.  The mortar failed after the 2nd firing, so I'll need to get some longer bricks.  However, they stay together well enough for me to get some forging done while I wait for the new bricks.

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I also coated the inside of the forge with ITC-100 after the Mizzou had cured for about a week.  I used up the entire pint I had.

I've been using the forge a lot the last few days.  I am working on an ambitious (for me) mosaic weld project, and have had to do a lot of welding.  I'm still learning its quirks, but I've been able to measure temps over 2350F so far, and seem to be able to get a good 8" or more up to that temp at one time.  I can easily get 12" hot enough to work it without shearing the welds on my work piece.  This was important to me since I can easily draw out that much in one heat with my press.

Once it is up to temp, I can maintain welding heat at about 7 to 10 PSI with the burners.

The burners seem to be running pretty much neutral.  I will probably fab up a sleeve to use as a choke to richen up the mix a bit for welding.

Here is a shot of a bar coming up to temp.  You can see the hot spots where the burners are, but a few moments later, the bar was a uniform temp.  In fact, the temperature inside the forge is much more evenly heated than my last one.  It seems like it is taking the steel a bit longer to come up to temp, but I have been working with a pretty big billet this week, so it may not be the forge design.  It may also be that the diameter is quite a bit larger than my old one so the walls are farther from the steel.

I used two pieces of kiln shelving as a sacrificial floor.  I haven't quite given up using flux yet, and my last forge turned into a gooey swimming pool of molten flux once it got up to temp.  (It had a satanite floor rather than Mizzou)

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All in all, I am very happy.  I'm getting about 150F more than I could before which seems to make the welding easier.  The extended length allows me to get something like this up to temp so I can get a nice squish on the whole stack at one time.  It's about 2"x2"x4" long, and I would not have been able to get it heated evenly in my old forge.

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Edited by Brian Dougherty

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Check plumbing stores for the black iron pipe.  Not only is it hard to find it got to be very speedy.  Even where I live it’s hard to find.

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You can order black iron pipe nipples from Mcmaster carr, in several schedules.  That said nothing to worry over here if that pipe gets hot enough to burn the zinc you have bigger problems ..

MP

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Yeah, I'm not at all worried about the zinc burning, just compatibility between the galvanization and the gas.

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3 hours ago, Jerrod Miller said:

Link to another forum discussion about galvanized pipe for gas.  Personally, I wouldn't worry about it in this situation.  

Thanks, I was never clear about why black iron was used for gas.  Looks like I am not the only one :)

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I never thought about black pipe being hard to find.  All the places that I have lived it was easy to find at the major hardware stores.

Doug

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