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Aiden CC

Recent Knives (Kitchen, Yakutian, and Puukko)

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Over winter break I finally had some time to work on knives, so I got a few done. Last year I made 12 over break, but I decided to tone it down this year and made half that many. Here they are:

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From left to right: chef's knife in 80crv2 and olivwood, three Sakha (Yakut) knives from leaf spring/80crv2 and curly birch, a replica of an old puukko I have from 80crv2 and curly birch, a kitchen knife my girlfriend forged (though I ground it and finished the handle) with an 80crv2 blade and walnut handle, and finally a paring knife in 80crv2 and olive. I've really been appreciating the design and appearance of Sakha knives recently, and the leftmost one is my attempt at some degree of historical accuracy, and I'll probably start a design a critique thread about this type of knife with pictures of the originals I've been looking at and some questions I have about the style. 

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I also made a couple of sheaths as well, I'm particularly proud of the puukko one. Both have wooden liners for the blade.

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I've had trouble with these seams in the past, and I think this is my best one so far.

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A side by side with the original. As you can see, the exact blade shape is a guess, due to the missing tip, and change in profile due to sharpening. I also opted to have wider "flats" on the blade to make up for the fact that they likely have shrunk as the blade was sharpened over time.

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The handle took even more guesswork, since on the original it is split open in a way which makes it difficult to see the original dimensions. I did my best o measure and extrapolate and am fairly pleased with how it came out. 

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A photo showing the wedged handle construction on the Sakha knives.Yakut-10.jpg

A comparison of a fuller produced with a ball-pein hammer and the more consistent one made from a swedge block. I like the latter much better, and though the one left is like what you see on most modern versions, I haven't seen any pictures of originals that look like this.

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Also, a picture of the other side of these knives (when I was first researching these it took me a very long time to find a picture showing what the non fullered side looked like).

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A quick comparison of different materials/finishing techniques. Left and center are curly birch bought by the block, presumably from larger trees, which the right one is from birch I bought in the form of planks from very small trees, and although it contains some heart wood, the figure is otherwise very tight and good looking. The right two are tests of a new finishing technique where I burnished with 800 grit sand paper once, and then several times with fine steel wool. My original process (left) was just to use the sand paper. I thick the new processes closes the surface better and brings out more figure. All are finished with 50/50 boiled linseed oil/turpentine.

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Finally, a nice little knife I helped my friend make, which I'm posting since I think he did a really good job. Other than some trouble in glue up where I had to step in slightly to save it, it was all him. Blade is 80crv2, handle is ebony and copper.

Thanks for looking, questions, comments, and critiques are always welcome!

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Nice work, the puukko sheath really turned out nice.  Thanks for sharing the Sakha (Yakut) knives  - I never heard of them before....something else to add to my "gotta make it some day" list.

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Well done all round.  B)

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On 1/22/2019 at 7:16 PM, Alan Longmire said:

Well done all round.  B)

Thanks!

On 1/22/2019 at 6:12 PM, MikeDT said:

Nice work, the puukko sheath really turned out nice.  Thanks for sharing the Sakha (Yakut) knives  - I never heard of them before....something else to add to my "gotta make it some day" list.

Thank you, for the sheath I switched up my technique a little bit. I used to make the holes for stitching by pushing the awl through both sides of the leather in one go, but this time I made the holes on each side individually (still one at a time though) and found it yielded a much more even look (also I poked myself in the thumb much less). I found the Sakha knives fun to make, and they checked off the boxes of "interesting to forge" as well  as "easy to grind and polish, which are what I am finding defines a lot of the knives I enjoy making the most.

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Nice work. 

I think you nailed it replicating that old puukko. Looks quite similar. Any idea how old that puukko is? Just curious. 

The birch on the yakut knife all the way to the right (second from last picture) looks awesome! Almost looks spalted. 

Glad to see youve been busy, keep up the good work! 

 

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5 hours ago, Will W. said:

Nice work. 

I think you nailed it replicating that old puukko. Looks quite similar. Any idea how old that puukko is? Just curious. 

The birch on the yakut knife all the way to the right (second from last picture) looks awesome! Almost looks spalted. 

Glad to see youve been busy, keep up the good work! 

 

Thanks! The puukko was described as being from the 19th century where I bought it. There wasn't anything that jumped out at me to disprove that, but I don't have a good way of actually seeing how old it is. There have been knives that look like that for a very long time.

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The birch in that knife came in the form of these planks I got from Brisa, and I've found that it is much more figured (and much cheaper per knife) than the blocks that you can buy of the same wood.

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Very nice looking planks you have there. 

I agree, it is usually cheaper to buy by the board if you use a lot of a certain wood. If only i could convince my local lumber mill to start dealing with ebony... :P 

Edited by Will W.

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