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finaly got my makeshift shop up


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Its been quite a while since i posted on here about me trying to get a little shop up, but i did it :D

I have a breakdrum forge, railroad rail anvil, and a drinking troff I had lieing around as a quench.

I got some metal fence posts i found in the back yard, some big round pieces of metal that are about 1ft long each, maybe an inch in diameter (a little much, but o well), and some flat metal i found at menards. This will all be my test metal, as i figure i shouldnt need any certain grade when i first start out.

I got vice grips as tongs now, but i should be getting some from ebay soon enough.

there is one thing im having a lot of trouble with though, how do I evenly heat the matal? I think once i get down to things as small as knives i might not need much heated, but i still want to know for if i start doing longer blades. I am also wondering how much ventalation i would need in an enclosed space. right now the stuff is outside, but it wont be able to be once it starts snowing.

Would give a pic of everything, but last time i wiped my harddrive i guess it wiped the USP port.

 

If anyone has questions, comments, or suggestions on this post please put them on here. (especialy suggestions :rolleyes: )

 

~ Joe

Edited by Joe Mogusar
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Joe,

 

Sounds like you have quite a nice little set up to get started. I agree with you on the low quality steel for practicing forging. But you should think about finding some old car springs and such so you can get the hang of heat treatment too.

 

If you want to heat a larger portion of metal, all you have to do is move the metal through the fire, allowing where ever you want to get hot equal amount of exposure to the heat.

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Joe,

 

Sounds like you have quite a nice little set up to get started.  I agree with you on the low quality steel for practicing forging.  But you should think about finding some old car springs and such so you can get the hang of heat treatment too.

 

If you want to heat a larger portion of metal, all you have to do is move the metal through the fire, allowing where ever you want to get hot equal amount of exposure to the heat.

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Thanks for the tips, I have another question though. When do I heat traet something? I new I would need a quench for heat treating, but I have no clue what to do heat treating. do I just get the metal as hot as I can get it then dip it? Ive done that a few times and think its pretty fun cause of how the metal makes all that popping, but I dont know when to do it.

Answer if you can please.

 

~ Joe

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Joe,

Make SURE the fence posts are not galvanized. The zinc will make gas that will KILL you when it burns.

 

That being said, go to Don Fogg's web site Don Fogg and read the tutorials in the Craft of Bladesmithing section. Then read them again. Visit the links on water-hardening and spark testing (look in 'Cup of Coffee')

 

Find some steel with some carbon in it. Old springs are good sources. I use truck leafs.

 

Then try this:

 

Heat and pound to shape. (Notice how much metal you lose to oxidation.)

 

Normalize three times. [Heat to red and air cool to black]

 

File/Grind to final shape. Not too thin! not too hot. An overnight soak in vinegar will soften the scale and make this easier.

 

Normalize again if you got it very hot.

 

Heat Treat. Try vegetable oil first. Get up to color and test for non-magnetic..that's quenchin' temp. Dunk in oil and pray.

 

Temper at 400 Deg for about 1 hour. You are looking for light straw color on the metal. (clean up a test patch on the blade before tempering)

 

File, sand, and polish. Piece of cake!

 

You are getting there, man. This is fun ain't it?

 

Tracy

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Thanks for the tips on the fence posts, I have no clue if they are galvenized so i just wont use them. thanks for all the other tips too. I dont know how to keep the forge at any one temperature, and i dont think i can check to see what temperature its at since its an open air forge. any suggestions or ideas on how i would go about doing either of these? my blower is an electric blower for circulating air threw a wood stove, if that helps any.

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