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Todd Lawson

Anvil identification

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Hi all,

My father in law passed away a few years back, and I have his old anvil. I have been trying to identify it, but it has no marks on it as far as I can find, other than a round stamp in the side. It is REALLY used, so any marks may have been covered up, etc. His father worked at Hunter's Point Navel Shipyard back in the 40s and 50s, and I suspect this was an old anvil from that site. Any thoughts on it? Weighs about ~150 pounds, give or take. 

Thanks in advance!

Todd

 

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Looks like an early Trenton.  What does the cavity under the base look like?

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Thanks. The bottom is 100% flat, no markings other than a faint 1 1/2" circle in the middle that looks like a casting mark. 

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As I google images, it is looking more like a Hay-Budden anvil. I don't know what those anvils have for a bottom profile?

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Does it have square holes in the waist?

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Nope, there are no holes of any type in the base. 

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I cannot help much regarding the ID, sorry. But you have one heck of an anvil here, it looks to be in fantastic shape.

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I agree, thanks! I need to start smashing steel on it. :)

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I came accross this today. It seems to have a similar symbol between the feet.

Screenshot_20190206-024607_Chrome.jpg

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That (Jeremy's pic) is a Columbian, and they are cast steel.  I have one and it does not have that circle mark, the feet are taller, and the only thing under the base is a parting line from the mold...

With no handling holes in the waist and feet, and no depression under the base, it has to be a cast anvil.  So definitely not  a Hay-Budden, Trenton, etc... Hmmm....  Could be one of the Swedish ones that started coming in after the 1920s.  Some of those are not well marked.  I'll have to look into that.

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After a little more research, it seems most likely it is a Soderfors, made in Sweden for Columbian between 1923 and 1927.  My best guess, anyway.  

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Is the steel plate on the OP anvil really stepped at the heel, or is that just the way the light is hitting the side?

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Hard to say. On one side (not shown), it is a flat plate all the way across. On this visible side, it definitely looks like there is a step in the plate. It could be due to how it was ground down after it was built, or ???. It would be strange if it was flat on one side and not the other. 

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Most of these cast steel anvils had that stepped "plate" cast in to resemble a steel-faced wrought iron anvil, since smiths being a generally conservative lot were a bit leery of those newfangled cast steel anvils.  I suspect it got ground after purchase.

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