Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Conner Michaux

Little Edc WIP

Recommended Posts

Out of all the tools that i have i do not have a sanding block. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a rectangle of hardened steel, if I want alittle more give I use a piece of gasket material on the metal or I use a piece of oak I had laying around...

Edited by Adam Weller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive been sanding for a while but it doesn't seem like its removing any metal.. Im using 80 grit. And ive run out of the 80. I only have 150 now.

Im using a file as my sanding block right now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what you want: http://www.supergrit.com/products/RedlineRedFlexSheets.  Combat may have it too, a lot of places sell it.

I used to prefer silicon carbide because hey, it's harder, right?  Not necessarily.  The stuff I linked lasts a little longer without loading up as much and costs about half as much as Norton Black Ice silicon carbide, the previous favorite.

Buy a 50-sheet pack and use it like it's free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got myself a nice piece of birds eye maple for the handle material.  

 

It it doesn’t have a ton of birds eyes In it m. But it still looks nice.

21303F06-3C0F-4630-A6F9-8D848F3F1629.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oKay Ive been really busy lately, but Ive got some time to drill the holes in the blade. I need drill bits that can go through hardened steel, I didn't mean to but i hardened the whole thing.

What kind of drill bits do I need?

Also Ive seen people using some sort of cutting oil when there drilling holes into metal, what is that, and do I need it?

Edited by Conner Michaux

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can pick up a 3/16 inch titanium cobalt drill bit for about 5 or 6 bucks at your local ace hardware store.  Any bigger than that and they are going to get a lot more expensive.  You can also find them online as well on amazon.  But a single bit at 3/16 should run fairly cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Conner Michaux said:

oKay Ive been really busy lately, but Ive got some time to drill the holes in the blade. I need drill bits that can go through hardened steel, I didn't mean to but i hardened the whole thing.

What kind of drill bits do I need?

Also Ive seen people using some sort of cutting oil when there drilling holes into metal, what is that, and do I need it?

The best thing would be to soften the tang back up with a torch. I like to hold the blade in a bucket of water while torching the tang to draw back the temper. 

If you must drill through hardened steel, then you will need carbide. What Andy mentioned will not drill through hardened steel. Often you can find masonry drill bits at the hardware store that are carbide tipped. Those should go through it. 

And they are using cutting oil. Often people use tap magic or something similar. 

The vapor tap magic puts off makes me feel sick for some reason so I've since switched to this stuff and it doesn't seem to bother me and still works great

20190225_132712-1209x1612.jpg

Edited by Cody Killgore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ill work on trying to soften the tang, I don't really want to spend money on a carbide bit.

I don't currently have a torch, is there another way? I was thinking, Have the blade in water and the tang sticking out, and then get the jaws of my tongs get yellow hot then hold the tang of the blade in them. Will that work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With O1 you will need to bring it to a very low red and hold it there for a minute or three.  I'm working on a batch of little O1 knives myself and I can say it does not like my usual methods.  It forges and grinds just fine, but it's difficult to get it really soft afterwards with primitive methods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

With O1 you will need to bring it to a very low red and hold it there for a minute or three.  I'm working on a batch of little O1 knives myself and I can say it does not like my usual methods.  It forges and grinds just fine, but it's difficult to get it really soft afterwards with primitive methods.

Could it be that it air cools fast enough to create bainite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Conner Michaux said:

I don't really want to spend money on a carbide bit

These along with some cutting oil as stated earlier Conner should work for you, the entire set is only 26 bucks on Amazon.   I have a similar set of these just a different company.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW1361-Titanium-Pilot-21-Piece/dp/B004GIO0F8/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=carbide+drill+bit+set&qid=1551135135&s=gateway&sr=8-5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, AndrewB said:

These along with some cutting oil as stated earlier Conner should work for you, the entire set is only 26 bucks on Amazon.   I have a similar set of these just a different company.

https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DW1361-Titanium-Pilot-21-Piece/dp/B004GIO0F8/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=carbide+drill+bit+set&qid=1551135135&s=gateway&sr=8-5

As long as he softened the tang, sure. Those are not carbide. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Cody Killgore said:

As long as he softened the tang, sure. Those are not carbide. 

No there not, I also don't use 1095 steel for knife making as of yet either.  This is another one he could get as well but it's 81 bucks so not it's not a cheap drill bit set I might have to get some of these myself.

https://www.amazon.com/Drill-America-DWD29J-CO-PC-Qualtech-Plastic/dp/B00FXGOMIW/ref=sr_1_13?keywords=carbide+drill+bit+set&qid=1551136059&s=gateway&sr=8-13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not trying to veer off-topic here but just want to make sure there's no confusion.

I don't think you'd find a set of drill bits that are solid carbide. Solid carbide drill bits are pretty rare. The closest common thing you'll find to that is a solid carbide center-cutting end mill (intended for a milling machine). Those are expensive and brittle and need to be run at really high speeds with a rigid setup.

If Connor wants to go the route of drilling hardened steel, like I mentioned before, the search term to use is masonry bit. You'll see a little chunk of carbide on the end. And most of them should say "carbide-tipped". I've bought a 1/8" masonry bit at Lowe's and it did work well for me the one time I did it. They work well in a pinch but not something you'd want to use regularly for drilling out your tangs. It's best to have a softened tang to begin with.

And speaking more generally... you'd also probably save a bit of money buying several of the drill bit sizes you need rather than a large set, but that's personal preference I suppose. I've also never really found a big advantage to the specialty coated drill bits.

Yeah, O1 could definitely be challenging to get it to soften. Even with a torch it would be a little tricky as Alan alluded to.

Edited by Cody Killgore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Cody Killgore said:

Not trying to veer off-topic here but just want to make sure there's no confusion.

I don't think you'd find a set of drill bits that are solid carbide. Solid carbide drill bits are pretty rare. The closest common thing you'll find to that is a solid carbide center-cutting end mill (intended for a milling machine). Those are expensive and brittle and need to be run at really high speeds with a rigid setup.

If Connor wants to go the route of drilling hardened steel, like I mentioned before, the search term to use is masonry bit. You'll see a little chunk of carbide on the end. And most of them should say "carbide-tipped". I've bought a 1/8" masonry bit at Lowe's and it did work well for me the one time I did it. They work well in a pinch but not something you'd want to use regularly for drilling out your tangs. It's best to have a softened tang to begin with.

And speaking more generally... you'd also probably save a bit of money buying several of the drill bit sizes you need rather than a large set, but that's personal preference I suppose. I've also never really found a big advantage to the specialty coated drill bits.

Yeah, O1 could definitely be challenging to get it to soften. Even with a torch it would be a little tricky as Alan alluded to.

Good point Masonry bits depending on size I completely forgot about that one lol OPPS.  But those fortunately can range and vary in price as well but they are far cheaper bits to purchase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like ill have to get a torch, thats actually good because ive been looking for an excuse to get one.

Ive seen propane torches butane, and benzonate (I think thats what it called)

What kind of torch should I get? Or does it really matter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Conner Michaux said:

Looks like ill have to get a torch, thats actually good because ive been looking for an excuse to get one.

Ive seen propane torches butane, and benzonate (I think thats what it called)

What kind of torch should I get? Or does it really matter?

Those fortunately are farely cheap you can get a plumbers torch with propane tank for roughly 15 bucks or mapp gas for a little bit more.  I go through those like crazy sometimes.  But make sure when you do buy one make sure it's going to last you.  Then all you'd have to do is purchase the fuel and the bottles are pretty cheap as well only a few bucks a piece.  You could get two small tanks for around ten bucks or so.  Not to mention a plumbers torch is always handy to have around (especially on the 4th of JULY:lol:)

Edited by AndrewB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just the basic Bernz-O-Matic propane torch is fine.  Trigger start is nice, but wears out fast.  MAPP is hotter, but not worth it in my opinion.  I've been using the same $14 no-frills torch with a spark lighter for over 20 years.  Wore out two sparkers in that time.  Before this torch I went through two trigger-start torches in one year.

Finally, never buy sets of drill bits.  Decide what sizes you need and buy multiples of those.  Well, maybe buy one set so you always have all sizes on hand, but otherwise you end up with a few dozen sizes you never use.  Individual bits are relatively cheap and are usually better quality than the ones in sets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Ill just get the drill bit, I don't want to risk ruining the blade with the torch. How much sand paper do you think it will take to get this thing sharp?? I can't afford the 50 sheets for 50-60$ Right now I can only afford to get 10 sheets, but i'm not sure if thats enough.

The only stuff I have right now is 150 grit from combat abrasives. Which does not remove material that fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's hardened O-1, so unless you're going for a Scandi grind I'd go to stones over paper.  For that matter, I'd go to stones anyway.  All paper is going to do at this point is polish it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Like sharpening stones? The benchgrinder stone I have right now isn't really flat and would ruin the bevel.

Maybe a really course sharpening stone.

Edited by Conner Michaux

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes.  Sharpening stones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I’m not sharpening it yet though.. I need to remove more material from the Bevel because the edge is still thick. 

 

Or or is that what the stone is for?

Edited by Conner Michaux

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...