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Conner Michaux

Little Edc WIP

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Nevermind, I just found an  all metal clamp.

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Posted (edited)

Okay I was able to correct the warp to where you almost cant see a thing, Ive sanded it back to 800, With a few blisters. Now im going to drill the holes in the scales.

I should be able to glue them tonight.

 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Posted (edited)

EDIT. Dropped it and had to regrind a little bit. Turns out the softness was just Decarb.  

 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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It happens just re harden it...

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Posted (edited)

Oftentimes this can be from decarb. 

Not saying that's the case but it could be plenty hard but just have a thin layer of decarb on the outside that is soft. 

And if that's the case... Rehardening it will just add more decarb... 

Edited by Cody Killgore

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I have the holes in the scales drilled, there ready for glue up, is there anything I should use to degrease/clean off the scales? 

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6 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

I have the holes in the scales drilled, there ready for glue up, is there anything I should use to degrease/clean off the scales? 

I always clean up the blade, pins and scales with Acetone, just careful because it melts some plastics.......

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Okay I’ve got the thing glued up, I’m using G flex epoxy, and man that stuff smells Horibble! I’ve got five clamps on there. 

4367E3E8-6EB3-4A01-8DCF-422AD9736288.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

It may be too late but you should clean the ricasso area before the epoxy cures. Much easier now than later.

Edited by Joël Mercier

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That silver clamp is gonna be a lot stronger than that pistol grip wood clamp.just be careful that silver one isn't putting so much pressure on one side that it causes an opening on the other. 

Looking good!

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Posted (edited)

Zeb, yeah after a took the picture I noticed the sliver clamp at the end was opening a gap at the other side of the scales, so I put another silver clamp on to close the gap. 

 

Yeah im going to wipe everything off the ricasso.

Edited by Conner Michaux

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You should have finished shaping the part of the scales at the ricasso, very difficult to do after they're glued.

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Yeah I that’s what I thought, after I glued them on.. I think I’m on track to finish the scales tonight, I’ve got some boiled linseed oil to finish it off. 

F48F64CD-23F8-44C8-87F7-AF4559CFE2AC.jpeg

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I was shaping the scales with a chisel and mallet, probably not a good idea....I know that now because a chunk of wood from the scales broke off.. Im trying to glue it back on with more epoxy so lets hope it works.

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Yeah, it's best to shape these at this stage (especially on hard chippy woods) with a belt grinder, angle grinder, rasps, files, sandpaper, coping saw, band saw etc.  Stuff that doesnt risk it splitting on you. 

Part of the allure of a hidden tang is the ability to shape the handle before putting it on the knife and sliding it on and off for fitting it before pins or glue. I don't do many full tangs but I imagine you could do the same thing by using the pins to check fit before glue. 

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Posted (edited)

I've been using a handheld sander, with some really coarse sandpaper, it's working well but it's not super fast, that's why I switched to a mallet and chisel, that removed a lot of material until it removed too much... Are there files or rasps specifically for wood? Because I don't have any really ruff files.

 

EDIT just after writing this I remembered I have a Dremel, that should work well. I'll give it a try....that is, if my attempt at saving the scales proves successful.  

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Yes Wood rasps a good tool to have they sell them at Home Depot for 14 or 15 dollars I have a set mysel.

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I could probably use a spokeshave to. Should I wait till the handle is done to sharpen the knife, Or does it really matter?

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Generally speaking it is best to leave the sharpening until after the handle is done (design allowing). Reason being you don’t cut your fingers as much when working on the handle.

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I prefer to shape the rest of the handle afterwards because that gives you some room for mistakes, but I shape and finish the part that interfaces with the ricasso after drilling the pin holes, then you use the pins to align the scales and shape them evenly....whatever your chosen method.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks, the broken scale is fixed so with some luck I should be able to finish this thing tonight.  I’m defenetly going to need some wood rasps.  

 

EDIT no I’m not finishing it tonight, I still want to copper wash it.

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Posted (edited)

All I have to do now on the knife is sharpen and copper wash it, The handle is done being shaped and I sanded it to 800 grit, I just put a coat of boiled linseed oil on it, Im not going to post any more pics until its totally finished.  Im pretty excited to finish this thing!

 

One quick question, After the linseed oil dries, what can I do to polish the handle? 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Have the handle as polished as possible before you oil it, and then rub a single drop in with your bare hand every week or so after the first application.  It will get hot, but it will also shine up.  Linseed takes a while to do right.  Tru-oil will dry glossy on the first coat, but can look a little plasticky.

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