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Brian Dougherty

Culver Inspired (Copied) Slipjoint

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40 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

... I have learned not to use a gorgeous bit of stag for my scales...

It's not really a nice piece of stag.  I bought some sambar for a project a couple of years ago, and the same place was selling dyed antler material that looked good on the website, and was a fraction of the cost.  I bought some just to see what it looked like, and have had it sitting around for a while waiting for a chance to shine.

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Hi Brian, thank you for all of your tips in this construction.  Especially like the pivot pin heat “temper softening” and beveling. I am looking for a 1 degree pin tapered reamer, where did to find yours? I also remember at a Batson symposium, hearing to make 1.5 turns only. Next question.....how did you peen the brass pins on the liners......the face side on the gnarly stag?  Might assume a punch with a socket or indent?

Thanks in advance, Gary LT

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Gary, I used a tapered pin reamer that I had.  They are pretty common, and I am sure you can get them from McMaster Carr.  In the US, tapered pins are a 1:48 (1" in 48") taper which I believe works out to just under 1-degree.  In metric speaking countries, the tapers are actually 1:50 so it would be even shallower.

I tried to stop about 1/2-way into the hole, but even with the drill press slowed way down it went quick, and I was quite a bit deeper than that.

I used a nail setting punch on the brass pins.  The dimple in the end of  the nail set made it a little easier stay on the pin.  It still required 3 hands to do, and I muffed it up a bit.  I will go back and work on prettying up the pins before it is all done.  I'm sure someone has figured out a better way to do them.

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I appreciate you response Brian, thanks. I’ll check with them.

Gary LT

 

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That came out great Brian. Now I want to do another slip-joint.

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Wow factor of extreme  !!              B)

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OK, after a bit of touch-up and sharpening, I'm calling this one done.

This is way too many photos, but I was playing with a different light box setup, and having fun.

I'll probably carry this one around for a bit to see how it performs. Sorry to the eventual recipient, but it's too good of a data point to loose :)

For the sake of posterity:

Blade: 3" long made from 1095 and 15N20

Spring: Made from the same billet as the blade

Liners: mild steel

Scales: Dyed stag

Bolsters: Nickel silver

And the pics:

 

KITH 2019 1.jpg

KITH 2019 2.jpg

KITH 2019 3.jpgKITH 2019 4.jpgKITH 2019 5.jpgKITH 2019 6.jpgKITH 2019 7.jpgKITH 2019 8.jpg

 

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Very cool, very cool, I don’t think i would be able to let that one go.. 

good work! 

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That’s about as amazing a pocket knife as I’ve ever seen sir. Beautiful work!

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Hi Brian

Well done, I will be very proud if I can ever make something close to that. B)

Apart from all the other challenges my attempts at restoring an old folder failed at the re-assembly point, do you use a jig of some kind?

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I don't know Brian.  It looks like the blade is roughly .002" off center when it's closed.  :D

Seriously though, that is one hell of a knife.  You should be proud of it.

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Thanks everyone.  I'm pretty chuffed at how it came out, but it's funny how much I overlook a the flaws on my first attempt at anything.  If my next one doesn't come out much better, I'll be pretty sour.

@Gerhard Gerber, I didn't have an assembly jig, but it seemed like it took 5 hand plus a helper monkey to hold everything when I peened the pins.  That is one place that a jig would have been nice, but I'm not sure what it would look like since every knife is likely to be different.  

If I make many more of these, I'll build one of the fixtures to measure the total lift of the spring (slipjoint guys have a name for that fixture, but it escapes me), but using calipers works well enough for making one at a time.

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15 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

 

@Gerhard Gerber, I didn't have an assembly jig, but it seemed like it took 5 hand plus a helper monkey to hold everything when I peened the pins.  That is one place that a jig would have been nice, but I'm not sure what it would look like since every knife is likely to be different.  

 

Yes, a job for the 5-handed knife maker! :lol:

I've briefly seen an assembly jig during a GEC shop tour video on YT, and yes I would assume they have one for every model.  They guy makes it look easy though..... B)

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