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Zeb Camper

Scrap-mascus... Do you recycle?

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Hey guys! Welded all my cutoffs from multibar blades together today. Since i was working with odd shapes I didnt try to make it one solid billet. Looking like it should look cool. I may or may not manipulate the bars further before making another multibar out of it... I'm open to ideas! 

Also, if you've done this before feel free to share! 

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Heck yeah! The smith who wastes good steel doesn't go to Valhalla. I read that in one of the Eddas I think...….:o

I have taken all those little triangles from accordion cut patterns and welded them back into a bar. Ed Caffrey takes all his little bits and puts them into a can with powdered 1080 or 1095 and makes fossil Damascus.

Caffrey Fossil.png

Edited by Joshua States
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This is wonderful.

You see this in historical blades sometimes. For example, 6 of the early medieval (6th century Anglo-Saxon) spearheads buried in the cemetery at Edix Hill (Cambridgeshire) were made from scrap, including bits of pattern welded swords.

I've been wanting to make one for a few years just to see what it looks like--your results are inspiring!

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14 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Thats a really good looking knife Joshua!

That's an Ed Caffrey Fossil blade. It better look good!

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You can see one of my scrapmascus blades here.

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Oops! I thought it was yours! Ed's blade looks slick, and yours does too! I had no idea "scrapmascus" was already in the lexicon!

6 hours ago, Andrew W said:

This is wonderful.

You see this in historical blades sometimes. For example, 6 of the early medieval (6th century Anglo-Saxon) spearheads buried in the cemetery at Edix Hill (Cambridgeshire) were made from scrap, including bits of pattern welded swords.
 

Where can I find out more? Do you have any links!?

Edited by Zeb Camper
Daggownitt!

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8 hours ago, Andrew W said:

You see this in historical blades sometimes. For example, 6 of the early medieval (6th century Anglo-Saxon) spearheads buried in the cemetery at Edix Hill (Cambridgeshire) were made from scrap, including bits of pattern welded swords.

I told you so.

22 hours ago, Joshua States said:

The smith who wastes good steel doesn't go to Valhalla

 

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15 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

Where can I find out more? Do you have any links!?

It's in Malim, T. and Hines, J., (1998). The Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Edix Hill (Barrington A), Cambridgeshire: excavations 1989--1991 and a summary catalogue of material from 19th century interventions.

This has now been put online as a (legal) pdf, which you can download here: https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/library/browse/issue.xhtml?recordId=1075286&recordType=MonographSeries

The metallurgy analysis of the spearheads starts on page 250. There are some great line drawings of the blade cross-sections, and a detailed discussion.

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On 2/25/2019 at 4:42 PM, Zeb Camper said:

I had no idea "scrapmascus" was already in the lexicon!

I am going to take some of the smaller pieces with good figure and work with a silver smith/jeweler who will make some settings for them. I'm thinking pendants. Maybe earrings.

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I've heard another smith refer to the same thing as Scrapahagane.

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I save all my damascus offcuts, I like to make jewelry or small fittings from them.

I haven't forged those bits back into a blade yet, but I have forge welded bits of broken and discarded blades into a railroad spike once as B)

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