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Hmm. Gonna see if this works.

IMG_20190228_175630272.jpg

IMG_20190228_175730983.jpg

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You have piqued my interest, please do post your results.......................B)

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That is Refractory Cement, intended for sticking bricks together, it is not Castable Refractory.  Refractory is for building fireplaces.  You need a Castable Refractory, such as Kast-0-Lite.  See the products on the Forge Supplies page at www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com.  

Let me know if I can help you.

Wayne

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I gave this stuff a try for the first time this year.  I coated the new inswool in my forge with it and so far I'm very happy.  It has some sand or fine aggregate in it so it should work to fill the  holes in your fire brick. 

I'm curious as to how you came by those holes.

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I did my first forge with that stuff. While it's not super high temp, it worked for a while until I tried forge welding which made it crumble. I am using the swirl type so the flame hits directly on the wall and that's where it first crumbled. I now use a higher temp rated similar product (2800°f) which held up fine so far. 

I am certain is going to be fine for the inside of your kiln though.

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On 3/1/2019 at 4:41 AM, Wayne Coe said:

That is Refractory Cement, intended for sticking bricks together, it is not Castable Refractory. 

The product description and manufacturer's instructions disagree with your assessment. The product claims it can be used to cast individual bricks, repair holes in bricks, or cast the floor of a bread or pizza oven.

On 3/1/2019 at 4:54 AM, Gary Mulkey said:

I'm curious as to how you came by those holes.

I melted a billet of three-color Mokume in my early days of learning how to make the stuff. The brass melted out and stuck to the floor. I finally got around to fixing it because my knife holders wobbled in the pits and irritated me one last time. 

On 3/1/2019 at 4:54 AM, Gary Mulkey said:

I coated the new inswool in my forge with it and so far I'm very happy.

 

On 3/1/2019 at 5:52 AM, Joël Mercier said:

it worked for a while until I tried forge welding which made it crumble.

Well, I took what was left over and poured it in the bottom of my welding forge. I use a ribbon burner. We will see how it does. I'm going to let this cure for a week before firing it up.

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9 hours ago, Joshua States said:

 

Well, I took what was left over and poured it in the bottom of my welding forge. I use a ribbon burner. We will see how it does. I'm going to let this cure for a week before firing it up.

A week certainly won't hurt anything.  I  let it dry 48 hours before firing the forge.

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I used the same stuff to bond two soft firebricks together to make the sliding door on my forge.  After the 2nd firing, the bricks failed adjacent to the joint, but the rutlands is still intact after several more hours at welding heat.

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I couldn't wait. I had knives to HT. Worked like a charm it seems.

Kiln repair (2).JPG

Kiln repair (3).JPG

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My forge is still coated with this stuff.  I intent to replace it when I rebuild the thing with proper materials. 

That stuff is basically the same material as a hard fire brick, silica based.  Although it is tough stuff, I believe I'm losing some efficiency from my forge from it. 

I only have about 1/8in of this stuff on my wool blanket, and it probably should be a thicker layer to prevent that.  But as a heat robbing Ba&$%^d! like a hard fire brick, I choose to leave it that way. I'm thinking about investing in some IR reflective paint to put over it until I work out how to rebuild my primary forge to see if I can improve it a little for the work I'm approaching.

 

For a Kiln or something intended to run at lower temps and sustain a temp over a long period of time, then this will probably work just fine.  Which looks to be your application here.  You'll have to share your results.

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