Jump to content
AndrewB

Okay yes this is going to be a DUMB question

Recommended Posts

I've tried to do it that way lol.  But every time I attempt that everything just goes bad lol.  Just bad then I find myself having to start over again.  So for now until I can get better at free handing it I would much rather prefer to use dyes.  Okay so you're saying flat faced dyes?  No edges no curved edges just a flat square face to make the dyes for hidden tang set downs?  Okay then no those current dyes I have are not wasted they will be used as hot cutter dyes.  I'll have to call the local ace and see if they have any more of that size metal in stock so I don't have to order out for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay I had barely just enough material to make two more dyes.  These dyes are square and flat, I'm hoping these ones will work okay for making my hidden tang features I want.  I do have more metal on order as I still need to make some fullering dyes lol.  But yea I was lucky I had just enough material to cut these out.  So I have a set of hot cutter dyes not really sure what I would call these for dyes.  But yea these are done and made.  I did a tiny bit of sanding to get the cut marks off it.  But hopefully these will work for the hidden tang.

IMG_20190308_134104777.jpg

IMG_20190308_134113374.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy,

Take a look at the dies on the Blacksmiths Depot for a sense of the geometry you're looking for. I've used a set of 3/8" round fullers to set shoulders, then using the edge of the anvil and hammer control to forge the actual tang. You can get relatively sharp corners this way, and it leaves a slight radius at the junction which helps with preventing the nucleation of cracks as you work. That can be taken care of later with files or the belt sander in a minute or two if you really want sharp corners in there. Even with the 3/8" radius however, I can use it as a guillotine on smaller stock.

If I remember right, you have a bar of mild, right? I would be very surprised if you would be able to use that long term as a hot cutter. The current geometry will round over, and anything steeper would deform almost immediately. Not to say it won't work for a little while, but I think you would be better suited to round over the points into fullering dies, assuming the bottom die would still be long enough to sit above the lower edge of the magician (even then you could add a spacer underneath). To make a set of the round fullering dies, I would have started almost exactly as you have done already and do as has been mentioned above and just round them over. No need to panic!

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I just wasn't wanting to spend a fortune on dyes along with the guilotene tool that I have lol.  So I just opted for the cheaper mild steel.  I know it wont last me for ever, but it will work for the time being.  At least that stuff is decently priced and I can easily get it with out having to spend a fortune on steel or have someone make dyes for me lol.  Once that next metal order gets here what I'll probably do is cut it at a sharper angle and round it over that way so it's more pronounced.  But at least I have a couple of dyes to use for the time being.  Not only that my dyes are a bit thicker than 3/8ths the thickness for my dyes is 3/4 with 2 inches in width, so they are hefty dyes.

Edited by AndrewB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only contribute one of my favourite jokes......

Picture this, London, England, during the late 60's....

Hippy dude walk up to this old English gentleman and asks: "Excuse me sir, how do I get to Wimbledon?"

The old gentleman answered him: "Practice my boy, practice........"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lolAustin Powers Mike Myers GIF - AustinPowers MikeMyers Behave GIFs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat dies will work fine for what your thinking about doing, basically creating a tenon. Just watch from the material bulging and work it down between heats.  

Although flat dies will work just fine to do this.  If you think you are going to make a few more knives like this, think about making a set of butcher dies in the future.  These are like a hot cut, but the bevel is only on one side.  These will isolate material faster without as much bulging. 

Try it with the flat dies first, still be sure to crown the edges of the faces of the dies to prevent working some problems like a stress riser or cold shut.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×