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AndrewB

Okay yes this is going to be a DUMB question

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  I've got to make the dyes for my smithin magician this afternoon I want to try it out tomorrow.  I also need to make angled cuts basically cutting a bevel so I can round the points on my belt sander.  How ever I'm not exactly sure how to accomplish this because you can only rotate the band saw to the right for angled cuts and I'm not even sure if my band saw will tilt haven't experimented with that as of yet.  But what would be the best way of going about this, I do not have a torch, my little chop saw will not cut through this thick of material and NO I will not use an angle grinder with a cut off wheel.  I know dumb question right lol?  Anyways thanks in advance.

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Andrew,

 

I'm sure exactly what you are needing to do but here are a few possibilities for making a heavy angled cut.  One is that if your chop  saw won't handle that heavy of a cut then you can heat the material to a cherry red and the saw will cut much easier. 

Cutting on a band saw with a tilted table isn't usually a good idea.  Another idea would be to grind the bevel on your belt sander with a 36 grit belt.

 

If you give us some more specifics about what you need to accomplish then we can maybe give you other options.

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Posted (edited)

I currently don't have any 36 grit belts sadly.  I'm just trying to make a simple bevel for a fullering dye basically.  I do believe I have a couple of 50 grit Ceramic belts for the 2x48 I could use.  I just didn't want to spend all day on the grinder lol.

Edited by AndrewB

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I don’t know anything about your bandsaw, but this might work?

looks like you can angle the blade with the black knob (black circle and arrow). If you stand the metal up on its side (red drawing) then the blade should be able to cut it at a bevel (blue line = new position of blade) 

1EF391B2-78D0-46CA-B923-769940B42936.jpeg

I could be completely blowing smoke here...

Adam

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, AndrewB said:

I currently don't have any 36 grit belts sadly.  I'm just trying to make a simple bevel for a fullering dye basically.  I do believe I have a couple of 50 grit Ceramic belts for the 2x48 I could use.  I just didn't want to spend all day on the grinder lol.

You stated that you have an angle grinder.  If you put a grinding cup (snagging wheel) on it then it will remove material quickly as they are usually 18 grit.  Get it close with this and then grind closer to shape with your 50 grit belts.

Edited by Gary Mulkey

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Yea I got an angle grinder, I actually went out there and started on it.  I had to come in for a bit though because I was getting cold lol its snowing out again.  How ever I did use the 50 grit ceramic belt on the 2x48 and started grinding. It actually went considerably fast, for some reason I kept thinking it was going to take me all day to make them.  But I guess it's not going to after all.

22 minutes ago, Adam Weller said:

I don’t know anything about your bandsaw, but this might work?

The problem with that is I wouldn't have been able to get a cut the opposite way.  You know basically making a point.   Since I'm attempting to make the dyes for the fullering dye to make the hidden tangs for my guillotine tool.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, AndrewB said:

he problem with that is I wouldn't have been able to get a cut the opposite way.

Typically you can just flip the steel and come at it from the opposite direction to get both angles.

Grinding is probably easier if your not looking for a really extreme bevel, so if that's working for you, go for it.

Edited by Adam Weller

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I may have to give that a try but for some reason it doesn't always end up working out too well for me lol.

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Looks like I can cut good angle bevels with that saw that makes me happy the only problem is getting a good cut straight lol.

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Wow that worked beautifully for cutting bevels had to come in and warm up my hands but the first bevel is cut gotta cut the second and then of course gotta cut the dyes to length.  But yea using the saw is much much much faster.  Now that I know how to do it.

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Success dyes made... I know it was a pretty dumb questions but both You Gary and Adam helped out quite a bit thanks.

IMG_20190308_095511851.jpg

IMG_20190308_095502825.jpg

IMG_20190308_095521767.jpg

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Those are shears, not fullering dies. You want a half-round radius, not a point. Should be a couple of minutes with a file if you have a vise (which you need).

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3 minutes ago, jake cleland said:

Those are shears, not fullering dies. You want a half-round radius, not a point. Should be a couple of minutes with a file if you have a vise (which you need).

Yep that's all I gotta do I was just gonna run them on the belt sander.  Make quick work out of them lol.  But for the most part they are made lol.

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You started out with two 90 degree corners to take down. Now you have one 90 degree corner and two 135 degree corners to take down. I'm afraid you are no closer to a radius than you were when you started...

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Welp then those dyes are ruined and I have to order another chunk of metal.

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Just go for it Andy, and don't let the comments get to you; you will quickly find out if it works or not.

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Definitely not ruined, just some time with a file/grinder will make them fine just like Jake said. 

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Posted (edited)

well all I wanted to do with them lol was use it to assist in making hidden tangs that's all I wanted out of these dyes.  If I was making hot cutter dyes then yea lol Id be satisfied with the way they are lol.  But they were not meant for hot cutting.

Edited by AndrewB

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They would work great for many things. They could be easily modified to something else. 

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Well what I was origionally trying to do was cut them down to size so it would save me from having to spend litterally all day grinding them lol.  I still have to get some more metal though now I'm kind of wanting to make a couple dyes specifically for hot cutting.  

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If grinding that would literally take you all day, then something isn't working right. The beauty of the belt grinder is that it hogs metal quickly. 

It would take me less than 10 minutes from stepping into my shop to finishing those dies. Cut it off, grind the radius. They don't have to be precise. 

If the 2x48 can't handle the pressure to grind it quickly, you've got the 2x72. Even if the belt wobbles or you have to track it over a bit, it doesn't really matter here. 

Just saying, IMO stop over-thinking things and just do it.

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They're not ruined, and I'm not trying to discourage you. Five minutes with a file or a grinder and they'll be fine.

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24 minutes ago, AndrewB said:

well all I wanted to do with them lol was use it to assist in making hidden tangs that's all I wanted out of these dyes.  If I was making hot cutter dyes then yea lol Id be satisfied with the way they are lol.  But they were not meant for hot cutting.

Andrew,

If you are only wanting to shape your hidden tangs then with a little practice you can do that with flat dies.  Also, get used to working half on & half off the corner of your anvil.

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