Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
AndrewB

Maybe a Hunter? I dunno you guys tell me ~WIP~

Recommended Posts

Well needless to say I had a very successful Quench.  ZERO warps in the blade and no problems what so ever.  Now I've got it in the oven tempering.  I'm glad this blade hasn't given me really too many issues.  Now it's hurry up and wait while I do the two hour tempering cycle.  I plan for 400 hopefully for one hour each in my little toaster oven.  It works quite well.  This blade should hopefully be good enough when it's done to clean up.  How ever after I am done tempering the blade I'm wondering would the PH solution work well on removing the scale and oil from the quench?  I'm wondering if it does just as good of job as it does removing the scale from the forging.

IMG_20190316_134106941.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can honestly say I'm plesantly pleased with the way this blade is turning out.  As you can see it can cut and is decently sharp.   HANDLE time.  I'm hoping that once my bench top buffer gets here that will really clean the blade up nicely with a little bit of compound and of course I'd use the other wheel since it has 2 buffing wheels to buff the wood handle when I put it on.  Next step is to start working out the handle and carving out the tang space for it.  So far I do like this blade.  Over all it is 9 inches from tang to tip.  Blade over all length is roughly 6 inches.  With a thickness of a little over an 1/8th of an inch.  It should be robust enough hopefully to handle my every day tasks if I need it.

600 Grit Final Finish.jpg

600 Grit Final Finish 2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup Handle material epoxied onto the tang and pins.  So now it's just hurry up and wait.  I decided to do a full length handle this time to try it out since I have a better belt sander, and can adjust the platen so I can grind with out the platen for wood sanding and what not.  So now just hurry up and wait for this stuff to set and cure.  At least with this one I got the scales to close up and seal around with no gap.  There are small gaps at the front where I have it carved out just a bit for the tang to go into where it meets the blade.  Maybe tomorrow afternoon I can start sanding down the handle.  Good thing I have plenty of belts.  Welp as I said hurry up and wait.

IMG_20190318_124131535.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far the handle sanding is kind of going MEH.  It's not going to be the best looking handle, but so far it's comfortable to hold.  My level of skills with wood sanding is MEDIOCRE at best lol.  So I'm giving this my best shot.  I've got a tiny crack in the top I guess the epoxy didn't fill in all the way there or something.  But so far the handle is holding up pretty well with the epoxy that I used from Ace.  Wound up using that 2 ton clear epoxy.    I guess what I should be asking now how to make it look better?  I'm at least doing the best that I can for the time being.

IMG_20190319_121551518.jpg

IMG_20190319_121535265.jpg

IMG_20190319_121559110.jpg

IMG_20190319_121543033.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still have to get some steel wool lol.  I'm only at 80 grit on the belt sander at the moment.  I'm not sure exactly where I would be able to find it if I could find it in HD with out the cleaning solutions on it I'd definitely pick some up just not sure exactly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asside from a few minor discrepancies in my handle.  Its sanded up to 400 grit.  Holy crapola does that 2x72 make a HUGE HUGE difference in the way wood sanding works.  Especially seeing how it worked with my 2x48 GAH.  Major difference.  Now I am debating on putting the linseed oil on or just wait until I get some steel wool and my white diamond buffing compound lol.  Not really sure which to go for.  I am still going to make a sheath for this knife as well so it's not completely done yet  But holy cow the 400 grit belt does a huge difference in the way the wood looks.  I do notice that if you leave it in one spot long enough it will start burning.  So I had to watch how much pressure I put on the handle and on the belt.  I'm also overly glad I invested in a good respirator.

IMG_20190319_131304227.jpg

IMG_20190319_131257445.jpg

IMG_20190319_131250964.jpg

IMG_20190319_131309340.jpg

Edited by AndrewB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely improvement over your prior handle, but I would still grab a rasp (or some pretty rough sandpaper) and spend some time sculpting followed by some hand sanding (150 and 220 grit, up to 400ish), steel wool helps, like Alan mentioned, but if you don't have it hand sanding works. It will look way better and will fit your hand even better.

You can use a grinder for some initial shaping but I've found its really hard to get any kind of finished look with the grinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea I was trying to get a decent sculpting underneath,  the top of the handle is okay where it’s at, it’s pretty comfortable to hold at the moment but I want a little bit better looking under carriage.  I have wood rasps but I still don’t as of yet have a bench vice lol.  Good thing I didn’t immediately put linseed oil on it after I sanded it lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need for a vise - hold the taped blade in your left hand and a rasp/file in your right hand, and apply one to the other. Shape the profile first, then chamfer the corners at 45*, then blend into smooth curves. Repeat with sandpaper wrapped round a piece of wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I'm afraid you've vastly over estimated the capabilities of a buffing machine - their purpose is to remove the very fine scratches left by hand sanding, for which there is no substitute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Patience

That is something I have a lack of lol

 

50 minutes ago, jake cleland said:

No need for a vise - hold the taped blade in your left hand and a rasp/file in your right hand, and apply one to the other. Shape the profile first, then chamfer the corners at 45*, then blend into smooth curves. Repeat with sandpaper wrapped round a piece of wood.

Rasps I have.  Just working with the rasp for me isn’t well the best in anyway lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went back out to the shed did some re shipping of the bottom of the handle and I’m much happier with it.  I took the handle up to 600 grit.  I’m noticing that the higher the grit the shinnier it gets.  So I’m interested to see what the compound and buffing wheel will do.  I’m kind of wishing I got a couple of 1000 grit sanding belts lol.  For myself yes it is comfortable to hold.

D446C9EE-1A19-48EF-91B2-AFA062944F89.jpeg

52F0BFA7-A39B-46EA-9CB4-B0A5FE8E3CB0.jpeg

44D78655-B997-4E72-A990-767382C6FFF3.jpeg

62EA5F36-0E97-45F6-8CB3-70CA3DD79066.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm kind of surprised that with the finer grit belts even the brass pins feel like the same texture as the wood.  I just was kinda shocked that it could quite literally be that smooth.  I'm down a day of work on it or so while I wait on the buffing compound to get here.  I could use the brown tripoli but i think I'll wait on the proper stuff to get here.  On the compounds though I should be able to just store those in a ziplock storage bag and be fine right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a ziplock bag is industry standard for storing bars of compound.  You can actually leave it open, it doesn't dry out appreciably, but it does get contaminated with shop dust.  And remember, you need a wheel for each compound.  I have several in bags behind the buffer.  White diamond, red rouge, brown tripoli, Zam! (real name, it's a green chrome rouge for silver and some plastics that the other compounds melt and smear), and carnauba wax left over from making pipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Yes, a ziplock bag is industry standard for storing bars of compound.  You can actually leave it open, it doesn't dry out appreciably, but it does get contaminated with shop dust.  And remember, you need a wheel for each compound.  I have several in bags behind the buffer.  White diamond, red rouge, brown tripoli, Zam! (real name, it's a green chrome rouge for silver and some plastics that the other compounds melt and smear), and carnauba wax left over from making pipes.

I figured as much I just didn't want to get it contaminated lol.  But yea I took the handle all the way to a 600 grit finish I think to go any finer its going to have to be on the buffing wheel.  I've got some bees wax as well not sure if that would be good for anything buffing wise.  I've still gotta lock everything down on the buffer to include getting myself one of those fancy soft cotton buffing wheels lol.  I only have the two that came with the machine, sadly it's a central machine buffer so it may be a decent one and it maybe a piece of garbage.  We shall see.  I wanna get a nice nice nice shine on this handle before i even think of putting any linseed oil on it lol.  I wanna see after this handle is done if I can get better at it all together.  What I really want to start getting into is making axes and hatches things like that.  I'm a bigger fan of them than anything really lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, beeswax is too soft for buffing.  Carnauba, the hardest natural wax there is, is only used on pipes.  And cars.  It wears off.  And for the record I never buff my hawk handles, they don't need it.  Proper technique is all.  And Liburon brand #0000 steel wool, much finer than the no-name brands. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

No, beeswax is too soft for buffing.  Carnauba, the hardest natural wax there is, is only used on pipes.  And cars.  It wears off.  And for the record I never buff my hawk handles, they don't need it.  Proper technique is all.  And Liburon brand #0000 steel wool, much finer than the no-name brands. 

Sorry lol still learning the hole process I'm such a noob lol.  Once I get one decent looking one I should be good and hopefully have things all figured out.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I can at least now finally say I think this knife is FINISHED.  I just had one other question on the buffer worked absolutely wonderful.  I wasn't really going for the mirror polish since this is just being used to cut open boxes and what not.  My question being do I go ahead and put linseed oil on the handle now and let it dry over time?  Even with the few discrepancies in this handle.  On to the next.

IMG_20190321_122234210.jpg

IMG_20190321_122227504.jpg

IMG_20190321_122340460.jpg

IMG_20190321_122346067.jpg

IMG_20190321_122353696.jpg

IMG_20190321_122331528.jpg

IMG_20190321_122323805.jpg

Edited by AndrewB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×