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Richard Barrett

Clip vs Drop point knives?

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I thought I'd understood the difference, but now I'm unsure. Can anyone explain with some diagrams what both are and the benefits/downside of both please?  Or point me to a thread I've not been able to find please?

Thanks all Rich.

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In shape, both are a drop down from the spine towards the tip at the point of the blade. The drop point is a convex drop and the clip a concave one. This means that the clip gives you a more acute angle than the drop but slightly less weight and body at the tip. I don’t think there is that much in it but the clip would be slightly better stabbing into softer targets (deeper penetration) and the drop for harder targets (more structural support). The sharper clip could also be better for getting into small spaces whereas in skinning, for example, it would be more likely to create nicks in the hide or flesh. You can also check out this link. Hope this helps.

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Posted (edited)

Charles. So one bellies out from the drop, widening then going to a point? The other thins away to the point. Is that correct, if it is I'm in. I'm talking about the throwing knives I look at in the relationship to this question.

Thanks Buddy.

Edited by Richard Barrett

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Maybe this will help?  It's super rough, by no means dimensionally accurate, but I believe illustrates the difference.

Part8.JPG

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So would a clip point be better for throwing knives? What would a drop point knife be better for out of interest Alex?

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Not being a knife thrower I don't really have any first hand experience to say which is better.  Thinking through it logically I guess a clip point would theoretically stick a little easier and deeper, especially if you were to put a false edge on the clip.  On the other hand it would seem to be a little bit weaker as there is less material supporting the tip and would lead it to be more prone to breaking on an errant throw.  Personally when I think of a throwing knife I envision a dagger as it kind of gives you the best of both worlds.

A lot of people prefer a drop point on a hunter/skinner style knife.  The blunter point is (again theoretically) less likely to cut the hide while skinning.  That being said, when I process my deer every year I tend to gravitate toward using my clip point hunter and a fillet knife.  I'm not usually trying to save the hide, and I think they work better for getting into the joints while quartering.

Honestly what I think it boils down to is personal preference and experiences.  What works for you may not work for someone else, and vice-versa.

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What Alex said. Also I would think that for a thrower (also guessing here) a drop point or spear point would be better as it could be thrown either way up. If the clip catches the target slightly off it might not stick. All the throwing knives I have seen have had symmetrical double sided blade-shapes.

 

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Charles, you're dead right.

However they all look like things from out-of-space and nothing like a knife, I have those. I'm looking now at Bowie style knives like this one for throwing. Even buying something close to it and modifying it to something I can really throw well, get me? This is a big piece of steel with a clip point and would make a nice thrower I think?  The other knife is known as a thrower and made in your Country for throwing, hence the leather grip. 

81eF7hnk6XL._SY355_.jpg

jeff-white-thrower_orig.jpg

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If I was wanting to throw something accurately I would get a slab sided .45.  Knives really aren't balanced for accurate throwing.  They will tumble in the air.  Remember in those knife throwing acts at the carnival the magician actually throws the knives off stage and a dummy knife pops out of the target around the pretty young lady assistant.  If I were wanting to make a throwing knife I would form a dagger with a full tang and not even bother putting scales on it.

Doug

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Ah, I see. If you are after a compromise between cutting/chopping and throwing (or just like the shape) that shape would be about right. They seem to have compromised on a sort of ‘straight clip’ for the tip, which would make sense. If you left out the chopping part then a dagger like Doug said would be better. I haven’t made any throwers but I seem to recall that an even balance is key to having a controlled spin.

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I might be putting my foot in it because my experience is from 30+ years ago......had an obliging palm tree for a target with lawn around......and an obsession with ninja movies and the like, but..........

I don't think, within reason, the shape matters that much.  Sure something symmetrical and durable would work better, but you can learn to throw a particular knife.

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Guys, you're all correct in many ways. I'm not looking at any of the other knives attributes like cutting wood, but purely for throwing. However as you all (rightly) say I could buy an out and out throwing knife, but hate all the non looks of that kind of knife. I'm after building a knife around a heavy 15oz Bowie frame, 15'' long for what is called Mountain man throwing, hence the knives I've just brought are all over a pound in weight, with heavy steel to stand up to a lot of work. The question re clip points was what I do with them in relation to making them into good/better throwers. Thanks for all your interest and helpful advice. Richard.

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I would go for a straight clip or spear point for durability. 

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