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Joël Mercier

More interesting stuff from the steel nerds

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That is some good stuff, I encourage others to read it too.  

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Now that blog is serious!  And I thought I was a steel nerd.  :blink:  I am a mere beginner, it turns out.  Not the cold work so much, I sort of knew that, but the other stuff they have, yowza!

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Thats a pretty cool website, I don't understand most of it though :P

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Never seen that site before, but wow! Great stuff, thanks for posting that! Lots of great info there that'll take some time to digest :rolleyes:

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After a little digesting, and looking more closely into the examinations in the later portion, I wonder how much of a difference normalizing has on those results. It sounds like all of the grain related data is taking the samples as-is and hardening without any sort of thermocycling. It would be understandable that the cold rolled v. hot rolled grain size would therefore influence the post-hardening properties (why we normalize in the first place) but I'm not entirely sure if the summary explanation of the results is what I think it is.

Some of the questions I have would be easily answered if I had a description of the process from which the test results came from, but I'll have to try and track down some of the references they cited and see if they explain any of the experiments in that sort of detail. Also, I wonder what the difference in post-hardening/tempering performance is between cold forging, normalizing, and both normalizing and cold forging. I'm guessing there is some sort of hard evidence to suggest which is the best (raw performance, economy, risk of material failure, etc.) but I think it depends a lot on materials. As they mention, the introduction of carbides and alloys which can pin dislocations significantly changes how much and how effective cold forging works with the lattice, so maybe the generic answer is not as all inclusive as it might seem. Even a 'simple' jacketing of hard/soft metals (note the bit at the end about the Japanese techniques) could completely change what's happening at the microscopic level.

In any event, a great thought provoking article! I'm excited to run down the rabbit hole of what else they have posted there!

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The way I see it is the difference of HR vs CR would be negligible when the blade is forged but CR would be finer grained when used for stock removal. 

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33 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

The way I see it is the difference of HR vs CR would be negligible when the blade is forged

Absolutely.  

33 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

but CR would be finer grained when used for stock removal

This would depend on HT.  The point of the research that was done was to determine how much processing can be reduced to obtain similar results.  Hence the focus on times and temperatures (shorter times and lower temps means cost savings).  Cold rolled will need a less rigorous normalization sequence (say 1 cycle less, and at a lower temp) to achieve the same properties that a more rigorous sequence on hot rolled.  For hand crafted knives and such, it isn't a big deal.  In mass production it could lead to significant savings.  

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