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AndrewB

Stock Removal Knife Questions~

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Posted (edited)

  Okay so being I live in Washington and it rains on a regular basis and I run my forge outside in the open.  I was contemplating on still wanting to make knives during the foul weather.  So the other option to forging would be stock removal knives.  Basically grinding them out to shape with the belt sander and then heat treating them.  If I'm understanding that correctly on how it's done.  What I'm wondering is if this is easier to do for beginners or more of an advanced thing.  I'd like to give it a try after I finish up this knife I have made later on today.  I also wanted to try the stock removal because I wanted to practice with grinding out my bevels and actually try getting them at least half way up the blade.  I do have some BLUE Dykum on order for lay out since the sharpies weren't really cutting it for doing that.  But if you guys have any suggestions on this one, I'm all ears.  Can you tell I'm getting addicted to playing with my 2x72 lol.  Thanks in advance.

Edited by AndrewB

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I think most will agree that stock removal is a good place to start.

You can forge a perfect blade....then screw it up grinding.

Think of it like learning to walk before you can run.

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Posted (edited)

I’ve only been doing stock removal lately, just layout the knife idea you have on some steel, cut it out, file/grind the bevels, drill the holes, sand to almost final grit, heat treat, little more sanding, handle work, And done! I really like doing it this way, since I still can’t forge a good blade.

 

and you get a little bit more freedom with your design. For me at least.

Edited by Conner Michaux

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25 minutes ago, Kreg Whitehead said:

You can forge a perfect blade....then screw it up grinding.

Lol had that problem one too many times.  Took some learning to do.

 

24 minutes ago, Conner Michaux said:

I’ve only been doing stock removal lately, just layout the knife idea you have on some steel, cut it out, file/grind the bevels, drill the holes, sand to almost final grit, heat treat, little more sanding, handle work, And done! I really like doing it this way, since I still can’t forge a good blade.

 

and you get a little bit more freedom with your design. For me at least.

I'll be doing this mostly on the 2x72 when it's raining.

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Out of my last 7 blades, 6 are stock removal. I had to forge one because the bar was too short and narrow to make a bladesports knife. Nothing wrong with stock removal, there's a LOT to practice.

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4 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

Out of my last 7 blades, 6 are stock removal. I had to forge one because the bar was too short and narrow to make a bladesports knife. Nothing wrong with stock removal, there's a LOT to practice.

That was the aim behind it as well not to mention to be able to do some work while it's raining lol.  What my main reason behind the stock removal is learning the bevels mainly.  I wanna have really nice crisp bevels that are at least half way up the blade.  I have some dykum on order so that should help me out with lining things up.  I don't have a problem with learning to do it on metal not at all lol.  

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Posted (edited)

Dykem is nice, but the brush that comes with the bottle tends to put too much stuff of the blade and it chips when you mark the steel. Use something else to put a thin layer and it should work fine. Have you got a steel scribe to mark the bevel lines? I use a scribe for the edge and a caliper for the bevels.

Edit: here's my scribe. I used the tip of a pencil scribe bought on Amazon. I drilled a hole at an angle in a small block of hardwood. Cheap, simple and it works!

IMG_20190321_135906_1.jpg

Edited by Joël Mercier

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In my opinion, starting with stock removal is the smart way to go anyway. This allows you to practice the finish work, make a solid knife, and requires a smaller initial investment. 

This is just my perception but when I first got interested in knife making, it was pretty normal to start with stock removal. I think this perception has changed recently with the insurgence of interest related to a certain TV show <_<

 

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I've still got to get an angle finder.  I know I can pick one of those up at HD for a ocuple bucks so that wont be an issue so I can mark out the angles of the blade with the proper degree at least.  I was considering trying this out on the last chunk of steel that I have from one bar of steel that I've used lol.  So I've got enough material to work with to hold it with my hands and have enough.  I'll also have a pretty thick blade as well since I will be doing a stock removal blade trial on the next knife.  I don't think I'll go hidden tang on this first one and just do a full tang.   I'm curious though with grinding the bevels I should do what I've been doing and hold the edge where I want the blade edge to be and grind that upside down right?  Not sure if I've even been doing that the right way lol.

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Another stock removal trick, is to take a drill bit the same thickness as your stock, and run it along the edge of your blade pre grind, flip blade and repeat. it will give you a nearly perfect line to grind your 45's to in setting your bevel up.... 

 

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