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1 hour ago, Daniel W said:

Have you looked into using a sanding sealer? 

Nope, what is that? :lol:

This issue is new to me because so far I had only used very hard and dense woods for my handles. 

Edit: the pic makes it look a bit worse than it really is. Here's a video in which I believe 3 coats had been applied. One more has been done since.

 

Edited by Joël Mercier
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14 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Propane and butane evaporate quickly so perhaps these are part of the reason TruOil dries so fast.

That could be correct, however, my experience linseed oil thinned out to that extent, will dry very quickly using just mineral spirits as the thinner.

3 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

The methyl acetate is a plastic

Acting as a varnish maybe?

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FRP doesn't really buff out to a nice glossy sheen....why not stabilize the walnut so you're working with a known quality??

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Maybe I've been looking at this from the wrong direction.  I'm so used to linseed oil, that I've not looked at the properties of modified soy oil.  If you think about it, most of the products folks are finding work well and are easy to work with, have all been mostly soy.

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2 hours ago, JeffM said:

FRP doesn't really buff out to a nice glossy sheen....why not stabilize the walnut so you're working with a known quality??

Because I live in Canada and it's hard to find someone to do it at a reasonable cost. 

Edit: it is also out of the question to equip myself for stabilizing because I could only do it in the shed and there's no room left. I think I'll just stick with denser woods or buy already stabilized. 

Edited by Joël Mercier
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Hey Joel

How about if I send you a stabilized set and you can play around with them and see if you like them..

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1 minute ago, JeffM said:

Hey Joel

How about if I send you a stabilized set and you can play around with them and see if you like them..

That would be cool! :rolleyes: 

I do mostly hidden tangs lately, it's up to you if you want to send a block or scales. 

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This is a common problem for woodworkers.  There are a couple ways to solve this.  One is using a paste wood filler, like Pore-O-Pac made by Behlen.  Here's a link to the Woodcraft page that explains how they are used. 

https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/pore-fillers

They are applied before you put on finish, so it's a little late for your current project, but may help you in the future.  I haven't personally used them, but they sound like they are what you might be looking for. 

Another trick, which may help you now, is to apply the oil finish you're using and immediately sand it, while it's still wet.  This will create a slurry of oil and sanding dust, which will get worked into the pores.  Let it sit for about 15 or 20 minutes, then wipe off the excess, but not too aggressively.  After a couple of coats you should build up enough filler in the pores to get a smooth finish.  I've found that after each coat fully dries I like to sand with 320 or 400 grit sand paper, otherwise the finish looks a little muddy if you let the slurry build up too thickly.

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Thanks Rich it seems handy, I'll look that up

Tonight I decided to wet sand both handles with 1500grit until almost no pore were visible. Cleaned and dried with brake cleaner and reapplied oil. So far it seems it worked well. I'll update tomorrow :rolleyes:

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15 hours ago, Daniel W said:

Have you looked into using a sanding sealer? 

A very well respected South African maker recently shared his method for finishing Wild Olive: sanding sealer....he did nor specify the brand.

I got some Rustoleum because it looked like the best, turned into a complete mess when I buffed it, looks like the fibers of the buff melts into the sealer.

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I would like to add or hijack this thread if possible. I have searched through the forums here looking for a similar answer for leather spacers used in a handle, of which I am trying to complete now and have this handle filled and porous free. 

I’ve applied buffing with different compounds and also hard wax to no avail. Two thoughts going forward are: 1) “burnishing” as you would a sheath edge, 2) tru-oil, but I already have the waxy build and it may not hold well.

Any advice would help as I am trying to reach a smooth porous free finish, (See Treeman Knives).

Kind regards, Gary LT

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1 hour ago, Randy Griffin said:

What does the brake cleaner do? I would never have thought to use brake cleaner on a knife.

It was just to make sure there wasn't any dirt left before I put an oil coat on. 

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On 3/26/2019 at 8:37 AM, Gary LT said:

I would like to add or hijack this thread if possible. I have searched through the forums here looking for a similar answer for leather spacers used in a handle, of which I am trying to complete now and have this handle filled and porous free. 

I’ve applied buffing with different compounds and also hard wax to no avail. Two thoughts going forward are: 1) “burnishing” as you would a sheath edge, 2) tru-oil, but I already have the waxy build and it may not hold well.

Any advice would help as I am trying to reach a smooth porous free finish, (See Treeman Knives).

Kind regards, Gary LT

Personally when I do a stacked leather handle I soak each piece of leather in acrylic resin as I am forming the stack....once dried it is hard as a rock and polishes out nicely....

 

On 3/25/2019 at 3:46 PM, Joël Mercier said:

That would be cool! :rolleyes: 

I do mostly hidden tangs lately, it's up to you if you want to send a block or scales. 

Joel I dumped a couple of slabs of walnut in my stabilizing pot this weekend so if you send me a private message with your mailing address when they have finished stabilizing I will send them off to you to play with

 

Best Regards

Jeff

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On 3/25/2019 at 12:14 PM, Joël Mercier said:

Nope, what is that? :lol:

This issue is new to me because so far I had only used very hard and dense woods for my handles. 

Edit: the pic makes it look a bit worse than it really is. Here's a video in which I believe 3 coats had been applied. One more has been done since.

 

I'm sorry I missed this post on my last day off to reply.  Sanding sealer is used first on the wood so that the wood does not adsorb as much of the finish (linseed oil or poly) and helps to make that glassy finish in less coats of said finish.  My old man uses this stuff religiously between each coat of finish.  Sanding sealer, buff, finish, sand/buff - sanding sealer, buff, finish, sand/buff - continue. 

More of your oil will sit on the surface of the wood and make a hard looking finish.  I can say that in comparison to me just using tung oil and light sanding, his stuff looks better because of his process. 

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Thank you all. I went with eight coats of TruOil finish, sanding every two coats, until I could see no void in the leather flesh. Pre stabilizing in acrylic sound great. I stabilize buy boiling my wood slabs in an old pressure cooker. I have very good results. So I’ll have to rig something for leather spacers.

thank you again.

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