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Simple tomahawk


MikeDT

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Here is something I made for a friend - he wanted it simple with a rust browned/blackened blade.  Handle is hickory 18" long. Blade edge is 3" and 6 1/4" from edge to back of poll (1018 body with a 1075 bit).  Nothing fancy, just a basic hawk using Alan's great tutorial to guide me along.  One of these days I have to try my hand at doing some fancy file work on one. Critiques always appreciated.

tomahawk 3-30-19.jpg

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I do believe I'm going to steel your simple tomahawk design for my first hatchet when I get to that point.  Did you forge weld the eye piece for the handle or drift it out?

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Looks good Mike

"The way we win matters" (Ender Wiggins) Orson Scott Card

 

Nos qui libertate donati nescimus quid constat

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Your title say simple tomahawk. Sometimes simple is the best expression of something that is more than simple. Outstanding work!

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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Thanks for the kind words everyone.

 

AndrewB: I used the wrapped eye (forge weld) method - I just followed Alan's great tutorial (see below).  If you do a wrapped eye like I did, I don't think there is a better tutorial out there.

 

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That's really nice for your first wrapped eye, wish mine had come out that clean. 

Getting into file work will be really fun, it's such a nice way to accent these. A three corner file will be your best friend.

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Daniel, thanks for the tip!  I really like the way the ones that have file work look, so it is definitely on my list.

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I read threw Alans post there - and I would say the only thing I've done different during my file work was that I used a 3 corner file to layout the lines of the file work.  You can use the corner of a flat file - I just found it a little easier to start the line with the smaller file.

It's also a really good idea to take one of your files and grind the teeth off one of the edges to make a 'safe edge.' This way you can avoid the file biting into the borders of raised work. 

It's a challenge as there is very little flat surfaces to work on. If you go for the traditional file work of chevrons and scarf, I usually wind up with the little (x)  at the tip of the chevrons.  Just something that happens from the process, got to find a way to hide it.

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For really critical lines I do use a 3-square with one face ground safe.  It's like an Exacto knife for steel.  It is also necessary to get a true sharp point on an egg-and-dart molding like I used in that thread.  In fact, ALL my files except the half-rounds, needles, and chainsaw files have one safe edge.  It's just too handy a feature to not have.  

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Daniel and Alan - thanks for the advice.  I only have a couple of mini triangle files - now I have a good excuse to buy some nice medium sized triangular files. ;)

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