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Sharpening Tips & Tricks


Joshua States

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57 minutes ago, Randy Griffin said:

You should try the tungsten electrode. It'll put an edge on a knife Schick would be jealous of.

Does it actually remove metal, or is more like a butcher's steel that straightens and burnishes the edge?

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13 minutes ago, Alan Longmire said:

Does it actually remove metal, or is more like a butcher's steel that straightens and burnishes the edge?

It removes metal. You can start with a dull blade and make it razor sharp. Would take a while as the texture is pretty fine.

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On 4/9/2019 at 10:04 PM, MikeDT said:

For European sword sharpening, Michael Edelson has a good book (Cutting with the Medieval Sword) with a detailed section on sharpening.  He uses a 1x30 slack belt, sharpening up to 2000 grit and finishing on a board or leather up to 4000 grit.

This might be where the idea comes from, I was once a part of the myarmoury forum many years back when it was a really good research forum for European blades of all kinds, that's where about I head of the idea.  Really wonderful research was going on there at one point in time, its where I learned a lot about geometry and how swords should act. 

theres a video out there, of a very learned antique sword guru maybe this one

I believe he also talks about different sharpness for different tasks in swords and knifes historically.  Fella's pretty interesting.

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I've always found Schola Gladiatoria/Matt Easton, really solid in their work.  Fine edge vs. toothy edge, it may come down to personal preference or more likely how (on what) you plan to use the sword, just like knives we make today.

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I bought a cheapo little sharpening stone it has three grades of variances of grits on it.  But man it works great.  It sharpens up steel really well.  I think I spent like 20 bucks on the stone block at harbor freight lol.  It was a good buy.  Just put a small bit of water on the stone and went at it for about 5 minutes and the blade was fairly sharp I'm going to work at it more later and get it sharper but I can say the harbor freight sharpening stone block is a decent one.  I still need to make a leather hoaning strip.  Or how ever you spell that.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I came back to this because I have a devil of a time getting a knife really, I mean really sharp using any kind of stone and I have this little Damascus hunter just begging for a razor-sharp edge. I have never been able to get a knife sharp enough to shave hair off my arm using stones, and I have a lot of different stones. I have carborundum, Arkansas, and diamond. I have blue ones, yellow ones, black ones, a really nice color of purple one, and a red water stone from Japan. I even have one of those translucent Arkansas stones that @Alan Longmire raved about in the post above. (shh! don't tell him mine is 2 inches wide by 8 inches long!)

stones.jpg

The only way I have ever been able to get a blade to shave hair off my arm is with this.

belt.jpg

That's a 3M 15 micron mylar backed belt and a 3 inch wheel. I hold the blade edge forward just behind the crest of the wheel on top and lightly drag it along at about 25% speed. Now it will shave hair with very little pressure.

Bald spot.jpg

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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How are you sharpening with your stones? There's obviously something wrong...My last kitchen knife could split my arm's hair with the blade just hovering above the skin.  And that with just a 30$ King 1000/6000 water stone and a leather board. 

There's also a bit of controversy around belt sharpening. I've seen a study that proved it overheats the edge apex no matter what, unless it was running extremely slow or wet. 

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1 hour ago, Joël Mercier said:

How are you sharpening with your stones?

The obvious answer is "rather poorly".

1 hour ago, Joël Mercier said:

My last kitchen knife could split my arm's hair with the blade just hovering above the skin. 

Maybe I have really tough arm hair. I sharpened my kitchen knives on stones and they cut veggies and meat like nobody's business, but they don't shave my arm hair for diddlysquat.

I can see how some folks would burn the edge really easily. I apply almost no pressure and can wipe the dust off with my finger, feeling no heat. The belt grinder is running well below the 30% mark. Very close to 20%

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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https://knifesteelnerds.com/2019/04/08/does-sharpening-with-a-grinder-ruin-your-edge/

It is very possible to greatly overheat the edge with the blade never becoming hot. They have evidence from several sources. Even Global "confessed" their factory sharpening led to poor edge holding vs stone sharpening.

Edited by Joël Mercier
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If you want to see good evidence for burnt edges, edge retention testing and sharpening.......

.....AND YOU DON'T MIND A LOT OF SWEARING.........

....check out the Super Steel Steve's youtube videos.

 

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  • 5 years later...

Hi all!

 

It's been a hot minute since I've been on this forum and well in fact since I've done ANYTHING Knife/sword related. 

 

I've moved 4 times since I was last on this page and well a lot of my stuff has either been sold or lost between moves. What I'm really looking at doing is getting into Japanese Natural Stone Sharpening/polishing until I can get my Forge and grinder set back up. 

 

With all that said, there is A LOT of information out there about JNAT stones and well it's all confusing as hell to me.

 

Does anyone have any good reassures that breaks it down? 

 

Does anyone know of any good suppliers of JNATs? 

 

I can't find where these stones have their "grit" ratings, and well some sell for AUD$4000 and some for AUD$100 so I'm really lost as to where to start?! 

 

Any advice would be helpful. Currently using crazy sharp sandpaper on glass + 1000/6000 KING Stone.

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Hello Chris,

 

I believe your choice of stones comes down to what you want to sharpen. For example, straight razors require specific stone types and grits. 

 

Personally, I mostly make kitchen cutlery andy set of Shapton Glass stones do just fine for my needs. I've got 500-1000-3000-6000 (and even 10k that's completely overkill). After sharpening+honing on stones, I then strop one of my self made leather boards with diamond paste. 

 

I started with a king stone just like yours and it did fine. The Shapton synthetics just cut much faster on harder/high carbide steels. 

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Chris C-S said:

Does anyone know of any good suppliers of JNATs? 

 

A good source of beginner stones (the ones I have) can be found here: https://strataportland.com/collections/natural-stones-1

They list the grit range and some other aspects of the stone in their product descriptions.  I've found them to ship promptly, respond quickly if you have questions, and pack the stones very well.

I have the Morihei Amakusa, Binsui, and a lower grit one I forget the name of:lol:(edit: it's the "akamatsu" stone at 300-600 grit)  Don't worry if its not in stock, the website is updated frequently, and they have a very active and responsive Instagram if you'd like to send them a message about what you need.  They also have several other nicer and far more expensive stones

Edited by Jaron Martindale
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13 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

Hello Chris,

 

I believe your choice of stones comes down to what you want to sharpen. For example, straight razors require specific stone types and grits. 

 

Personally, I mostly make kitchen cutlery andy set of Shapton Glass stones do just fine for my needs. I've got 500-1000-3000-6000 (and even 10k that's completely overkill). After sharpening+honing on stones, I then strop one of my self made leather boards with diamond paste. 

 

I started with a king stone just like yours and it did fine. The Shapton synthetics just cut much faster on harder/high carbide steels. 

Thanks for your advice. I'm chasing stones for Knife sharpening most of the time.

8 hours ago, Jaron Martindale said:

 

A good source of beginner stones (the ones I have) can be found here: https://strataportland.com/collections/natural-stones-1

They list the grit range and some other aspects of the stone in their product descriptions.  I've found them to ship promptly, respond quickly if you have questions, and pack the stones very well.

I have the Morihei Amakusa, Binsui, and a lower grit one I forget the name of:lol:(edit: it's the "akamatsu" stone at 300-600 grit)  Don't worry if its not in stock, the website is updated frequently, and they have a very active and responsive Instagram if you'd like to send them a message about what you need.  They also have several other nicer and far more expensive stones

 

Thanks, I'll go check them out. Appreciate the lead.

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9 hours ago, Jaron Martindale said:

 

A good source of beginner stones (the ones I have) can be found here: https://strataportland.com/collections/natural-stones-1

They list the grit range and some other aspects of the stone in their product descriptions.  I've found them to ship promptly, respond quickly if you have questions, and pack the stones very well.

I have the Morihei Amakusa, Binsui, and a lower grit one I forget the name of:lol:(edit: it's the "akamatsu" stone at 300-600 grit)  Don't worry if its not in stock, the website is updated frequently, and they have a very active and responsive Instagram if you'd like to send them a message about what you need.  They also have several other nicer and far more expensive stones

They don't have a lot in stock right now. Do you have any other websites? 

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12 hours ago, Chris C-S said:

Thanks for your advice. I'm chasing stones for Knife sharpening most

Natural stones are not ideal on high carbide steels, but often excels at polishing the edge of razors or fine kitchen knives. 

 

So, let's say, for the average high quality stainless hunting knife, a diamond or synthetic stone is better suited. But for low carbides stainless or carbon steel chefs, natural will work just fine. 

 

In other words, for best results, you need a stone harder than the carbides you'll need to cut. You can google "carbide tear out" or search on knifesteelnerds about this.

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