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Joshua States

A tale of 6 blades.

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Actually, the branches of the guard will be thinned down from both faces toward the center line.

The round ends will be filed into more of a spade shape (like in a deck of cards) and rounded over.

Then the branches will get a slight curve forward.

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this is wonderful. I arrived late, but I have loved this thread. There was a lot of great tips and tricks. I enjoyed your breakdown of what craft and craftsman mean to you, also. These are some great knives. Important to document the fact that things just don't work right the first time in many cases, too. Great message for new folks.

 

You are sharing your processes and a little of yourself, and I appreciate it greatly. Thanks. Plus, I learned a lot. 

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I got one side of the Bowie frame filed and sanded to 600 grit. Depending on how the buff works out, It may have to be cleaned up some.

 

Ropework (1).jpg

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I am always afraid to use a buffer, for fear of ruining lines. 

of course, sometimes they can't be beat. I just don't think to use one when I am not making jewelry. 

I never took the time to really learn how to use a buffer, or go get enough different wheels to really get full benefit.

 

Filework is something that I would enjoy, but it never comes up on Chinese stuff, so I haven't learned it. I like the filework you have done. Interesting design. Two needle files, right?

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17 hours ago, Kevin Colwell said:

Two needle files, right?

 A jeweler's saw, 1/8" chainsaw file, and two little tapered half-round files (#2 & #4) with the flat side ground safe. The grinding produces a very sharp edge. They aren't really half-round and I don't know what the true name is. Pictures of them are here.

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I put my head right and started the vine file work on that boot knife frame. The frame is .06" 410 SS. Only one side started. Still a long way to go on this side and the other side is still a blank slate.

 

Starting out (1).jpg

Starting out (3).jpg

Starting out (4).jpg

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Another round of filing on that frame vine work. I never know how thin to take this pattern.  I have done it really thin, and I have left it more like this.

It still needs a little work on the second side anyway. What do you guys think?

Day two (2).jpg

 

Day two (3).jpg

 

Day two (5).jpg

 

 

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Oh yeah, I etched that dagger to see what the Hamon would look like. This is straight out of the etch and scrubbing the oxides mostly off with loose abrasives.

 

Hamon (1).jpg

 

Hamon (2).jpg

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That double hamon looks sweet!

 

Normally I am not a big fan of filework, but yours I do like, tastefully done on a handle frame, instead of all over a knife.

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Very nice Joshua 

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Looks great Josh.

Couldn't help but thinking doing the file work on a spacer is lower risk than directly on the blade, still a lot of work that I've never had the guts to attempt.

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Well, for those of you with the eagle eyes who noticed that the heels are not even on that dagger, I noticed when I really looked at these two pics above. It's one of those little things that's easy to miss when you are motoring through the process and you only find when you stop and take a photo. That must be fixed.

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Posted (edited)

I had to take a break from that dagger. It's not cooperating.

Back to the big Bowie. I have a Lin Rhea style intermediate forging spacer planned. So I remove the center spacer, pin it to another piece of 1/8" nickel-silver and make a copy, just about 3/32" larger. Sand the edges to 220 grit.

Shaping (1)_opt.jpg

Match the slot

Shaping (2)_opt (1).jpg

 

And fit it back to the package.

Shaping (3)_opt (1).jpg

 

Shaping (4)_opt (1).jpg

Make sure this fits on the knife, is a snug fit, and the pins all line up.

Shaping (5)_opt (1).jpg

Edited by Joshua States
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So this intermediate forging idea that Lin Rhea came up with has a lot of variations. I first tried this on another Bowie, three years ago. This time I wanted to try a different design.

First I layout the edge for the start, and put a series of small dimples along the center line (mostly centered).

Forging (1).jpg

 

Then I widen those out with a bigger punch

Forging (2).jpg

 

Now I take a smaller punch and set a dimple in the center of the flat spots and push the edges down. As I work it, I also push down the sides of the big depressions with the larger punch.

 

Forging (3).jpg

 

I got about halfway through this today (I had other chores to do)

 

Forging (4).jpg

 

These are the tools I used.

Tools.jpg

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On 5/6/2020 at 5:07 AM, Gerhard Gerber said:

Looks great Josh.

Couldn't help but thinking doing the file work on a spacer is lower risk than directly on the blade, still a lot of work that I've never had the guts to attempt.

You should practice on small pieces until you feel comfortable with the process. Even though I have done this many times, I still have to practice a little before I start on a new knife. 

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And after cleaning all the errant dings out of the other two spacers.

 

.Clean up (2).jpg

 

And after buffing the edge of the guard.

Clean up (3).jpg

 

 

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Posted (edited)

That looks awesome Josh, what a great idea. Be great to do with a copper spacer too.

Edited by Rob Toneguzzo
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Cool stuff B)

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9 hours ago, Rob Toneguzzo said:

That looks awesome Josh, what a great idea. Be great to do with a copper spacer too.

Any non-ferrous material that forges easily would work. The original plan for this was to use some Shibuichi, but the slab I made was a little too small and I didn't want to cast another one, so I changed to nickel-silver.

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Posted (edited)

I spent a few days tweaking and adjusting fit and finish on everything except the dagger. Today I finally put my big boy pants on and worked on the pommel.

Pommell 1.jpg

 

Pommell 2.jpg

 

And the view from the butt end. The bronze pin will get hammered through the tang and out the other side.

Then the ends will be cut down and domed.

Pommell 4.jpg

 

Then I need to file work the spacers and shape the guard.

Oh yeah, I put a nasty scratch in the blade and had to hand sand it clean again. I will re-etch for the hamon and polish.

Edited by Joshua States
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Today I worked on the guard a little. I was playing around on paper with some drawings and decided to mimic the Bishop's hat shape of the pommel on the ends of the guard.

This basic shape I have it in, is the foundation I use for a variety of different versions. I did some playing around with paper drawings and I think I want to mimic the Bishop's hat look from the pommel onto the guard. I'm not sure this will work, so I made a copy of the guard to try it out on. I blackened the faces and the profile edge so I could scribe center lines and the ricasso outline for reference.

 

Copy of guard.jpg

 

Then I set up the small wheel to take the round ends and create the larger curves and reduce the circle. This is one tip shaped.

 

One tip .jpg

 


Then I chuck it up in the file jig to limit how far I go and keep things even. I squared it using the mirror trick I posted earlier in this thread.
This is 220 grit on a 10 inch wheel.

 

220 grit.jpg

 


Then I take it out of the file jig, load a Trizac A45 belt and turn the speed way down slow to freehand the bevels and adjust the center rib.
This is where it is at now on one side.

 

400 grit (1).jpg

 

And the other side.

 

400 grit (2).jpg

 

And from the side/edge view. I will likely freehand the rest of the edge to feather in the bevels around the perimeter and reduce the edge, but leave the central portion of the guard at full thickness.

 

side view.jpg

 

 

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a delicate hand to bring this oen off. 

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Well now, that approach to shaping the guard is quite clever.  That's definitely going in the rolodex of techniques...

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That Dagger is looking great. I like the angles and shapes playing off each other. 

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I'm really looking forward to seeing this one finished!

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