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Ross Vosloo

Big Bowie, trying for exhibition quality WIP

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Hi all. So this is a big 10" Bowie I'm working on at the moment. I set it as a challenge for me, to see of I can make a really good quality piece, just for me.

Before the pics, does any one know how to get the smell out of bone? I found a big hippo bone on lake Kariba,  cleaned it up, but when I work it smells awful and that smell has stuck to the peice itself. Any one know what's the best plan?

20190405_154902.jpg20190405_165353.jpg20190409_170659.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Interesting profile,  I have heard that Hippos stink,  perhaps to the bone.....................:rolleyes:

Edited by Clifford Brewer
pungshooayshun an spellun

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A gentle simmer in water with a little trisodium phosphate may help,  maybe followed by a soak in 20% hydrogen peroxide, the kind hair salons use to bleach hair if you want it really white.

The simmer is what we did to prepare specimens in zooarchaeology lab, and while it stinks to high heaven (so much so that the engineering lab next door called the EPA on us, after which we proudly wore their assessment of us on T-shirts: "U.T. Zooarch lab: EPA certified obnoxious but not toxic!") it does remove much of the smell from the final product.  Just don't overdo it or the bone will get crumbly.  Skim the grease every few minutes and don't boil hard.  When the grease stops rising, stop simmering and let dry. If you use trisodium phosphate, just add a pinch.  It breaks down grease and too much will stop it rising as well as make the bone crumbly.  

Oh, and if you use the peroxide, wear gloves and a facemask.  That stuff will hurt you!

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Alan will forever be in my memory as "obnoxious but not toxic" now :lol:  (Ok, you aren't even remotely close to obnoxious, but too late to turn back now)

This post made me think about the chicken stock I was making last night.  When you simmer bones and other pieces to make stock, you are cooking the collagen out of the bones.  That is what gives the stock that gelatinous  mouth feel, and why the bones are so brittle when you are done.

It makes sense that you don't want to "Boil" bone intended for handle use for too long, or even at a true boiling temperature.  THe bones would get brittle.

One of the mistakes that you can make if you are cooking stock is to let the water come to a boil before you put the bones in.  When you do that the pores in the surface of the bone swell shut before the collagen inside can melt out.  It makes me wonder that if heating the water up before putting the bones in would be a safer method for those trying to clean up handle material?

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This aught to be good.....B)

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Clifford Brewer said:

Interesting profile,  I have heard that Hippos stink,  perhaps to the bone.....................:rolleyes:

Seems that way.

14 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

A gentle simmer in water with a little trisodium phosphate may help,  maybe followed by a soak in 20% hydrogen peroxide, the kind hair salons use to bleach hair if you want it really white.

The simmer is what we did to prepare specimens in zooarchaeology lab, and while it stinks to high heaven (so much so that the engineering lab next door called the EPA on us, after which we proudly wore their assessment of us on T-shirts: "U.T. Zooarch lab: EPA certified obnoxious but not toxic!") it does remove much of the smell from the final product.  Just don't overdo it or the bone will get crumbly.  Skim the grease every few minutes and don't boil hard.  When the grease stops rising, stop simmering and let dry. If you use trisodium phosphate, just add a pinch.  It breaks down grease and too much will stop it rising as well as make the bone crumbly.  

Oh, and if you use the peroxide, wear gloves and a facemask.  That stuff will hurt you!

Well lets hope simmering works. Got the bone peice simmering right now, will leave it for a couple of hours and see what we got. 

14 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Alan will forever be in my memory as "obnoxious but not toxic" now :lol:  (Ok, you aren't even remotely close to obnoxious, but too late to turn back now)

This post made me think about the chicken stock I was making last night.  When you simmer bones and other pieces to make stock, you are cooking the collagen out of the bones.  That is what gives the stock that gelatinous  mouth feel, and why the bones are so brittle when you are done.

It makes sense that you don't want to "Boil" bone intended for handle use for too long, or even at a true boiling temperature.  THe bones would get brittle.

One of the mistakes that you can make if you are cooking stock is to let the water come to a boil before you put the bones in.  When you do that the pores in the surface of the bone swell shut before the collagen inside can melt out.  It makes me wonder that if heating the water up before putting the bones in would be a safer method for those trying to clean up handle material?

Based on this I put the bone straight into already simmering water. Will report back :)

3 hours ago, Gerhard Gerber said:

This aught to be good.....B)

Haha, let's hope ;)

So here's a video showing the take down handle in its rough form. Let me know what you all think.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BwEkgZnHMa2/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

 

Edited by Ross Vosloo

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Smile for the camera, Ross :lol:

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9 hours ago, Charles du Preez said:

Smile for the camera, Ross :lol:

Have to concentrate! :D

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