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AndrewB

A few hours on the forge this morning

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I'm out of coal I can use to just forge until next month at least.  But I went out there with an idea in my head.  It's not perfect perfect heck even the blade edge isn't perfect but I plan on grinding that wavy junk out with the belt sander.  How ever with the hidden tang I am quite happy with the way that turned out.  Its the first one I've been able to make with out the steel getting too hot and melting down into the forge right in front of me.  I did normalize it before I pulled it out of the fire.  I didn't want you guys to think I was giving up on knives its just frustrating at times to get what I want and how I want it to look.  Its just a bit of the OCD that I have LOL. The tang actually extends about 5 inches or so further down I'll get a couple more shots of it later on after every things cooled off from normalizing. But at least I'm getting better at making these hidden tang things LOL.

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Good progress!

Now, rather than go at that with a grinder, study it for a while.  Use the OCD to your advantage.  Decide what could be improved with more forging time, and make a list of improvements to be made.

For each item on that list, make a plan of attack for how you would accomplish it.  (It's much easier to do this holding on to the cold steel in the comfort of your living room than when standing at the anvil)

The next time you decide to fire up the forge, take this blade out and try to knock off at least one thing on the list.

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that is very true lol.  I was just glad I didn't burn off the tang.  

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Good work on the tang. 

Why grind out that wavy bit?  Next time at the forge with this, take that wavy bit and knock it back.  If you heat up that spot where the wave begins at the tang, put the spine of the knife on the flat of the anvil where the wave bows up.  Tap that bow down flush to the anvil.   If you're edge is thin this may make a little fold over, but if it's 1/8 thick you should be fine.  That will take out a lot of that waviness.

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I tried knocking it back to straight it just didn't want to cooperate.  Its not that the entire blade is wavy its just the blade edge that buldges out a bit right before the ricasso.  Thats mainly what I was trying to work out is attempting a forged ricasso on that one.  So the blade edge at one point actually was further out towards the tang than at the tip.  But that's fixable with the grinder.

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Blacksmith say 10 minutes forging beats 1/2 hour of grinding.

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Yeah, one tap with a hammer will fix that.

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15 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

Yeah, one tap with a hammer will fix that.

Yea that's actually what I was thinking about last night lol.  Gonna get the forge out again today and straighten out the blade.  I also discovered a little warp at the end of the blade so it wasn't perfectly straight going to fix that as well.  So just one hit directly on the blade edge will fix that?

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One solid blow to the edge at a yellow heat will straighten the spine, but then you'll need a few taps to clean up the dent from said solid blow.  You could even use the peen to pull the edge lower at that spot, then smooth it back with the face.  

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NO MORE NOOB GRINDS FOR THIS GUY OOOFFF.  The tang I think came out okay, yea I still got a lot more grinding to go but yep NO more noob grinds as I said lol.  I'm actually putting in the plunge lines.

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Looking better than you think.  I would recommend that you slowly work the bevel back up towards the spine to give the blade better slicing ability.

Doug

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I still haven't even used my file guide yet lol I probably should with this one.

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Back out on the grinder this morning trying to get out all the forging hammer marks in the steel on the 36 grit belt before I move on to the next belt  I'm also trying to even up the plunge lines and bevels but for some reason I can never get the right amount of pressure I need to straighten everything out lol.  I also got to straighten out the right side plunge line since it seems to want to veer forwards i"m not sure why exactly its doing that.  Any ideas on this?  I am trying to do this knife all free hand as well no guides nothing.  This is more of an experimental learning trial to see if I can do it.

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I dunno its not the worlds best looking plunge lines but for a first actual time of trying to do t his right I can't complain.  On the other side I can complain about how I'm not getting enough pressure on my blade.  I took it up to 320 grit on the belts I think that's where I'll leave it until after the heat treat.  I'm not a huge fan of the mirror polish unless its on a handle how ever that will do I think.  At least there isn't a Noob grind on the bevels LMFAO.

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A bit of drawfiling will even those up nicely.  And congrats on moving from the noob grind to the sabre grind.  Try a full flat grind on the next one and see what you think.

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Not sure exactly how to do a full grind I'll have to find some videos on that.I also gotta figure out how I'm going to glue and clamp the handle because I'm going to use a block this time and do the actual hidden tang correctly LOL.  But I still want to do pins.  I also found a little bit of a bend in the tang while sanding today that I've got to heat back up in the forge and straighten before I go into the heat treat and quench.  But what I'm trying to figure out is do I just drill out the hole for the tang to slide into the block and fit the block then drill out the holes all the way through the tang and other side of the block?  That I'm unsure of not only that I'm also trying to figure out how I would clamp it down lol.  Its not like using the scales where I could just easily clamp the two sides together.

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Jus keep at it, you'll figger it out................................;)

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I plan on cleaning this blade up doing a bit of draw filing on it this morning hopefully I'll be able to get it heat treated and tempered this afternoon.  Hopefully since the weather has been behaving lately.

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Another successful normalization cycle and quenching cycle.  I love it when things go the way I want.  Checked the blade for warps there weren't any issues that I had seen it's now in the oven tempering.  I dunno why but quenching and tempering have just been to be so easy for me it's not even funny.  I dunno why so many others have issues with it.  But I'm just glad it hardened successfully.  I also tried out something new for a quench tank.  I took a bit of square tubing that I had left over and turned it into a dunk tank.  I think I like that option better than the one I've been using so I think payday I'm going to pick up 4 inch square tube and some flat sheet steel and make a quench tank for it.  I like that way better.  Plus I found you use less oil that way as well.

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Posted (edited)

I am totally satisfied with this blade.  Its already sharp but not sharp enough I only took it up to 400 grit belt I guess I need to get some new 600 grit belts already I should probably get some 1000 grit and 1200 grit for wood finish but yea I could only take it up to 400 so no mirror polish.  I don't really care about the marks on the tang since its going to be hidden.  But the rest of the blade yea I can live with that lol.  Especially since it was technically my first successful saber grind. I've just gotta work on getting even bevels more.  Now to figure out how I'm going to do the handle lol UGH.  NO clue.  On a side note looks like I wont be using wood blocks for handles lol I've blown out my electric drill no biggy.  Scales I understand and are fairly easy for me to do.  I can still technically do hidden tangs with scales right lol?

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Edited by AndrewB

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Getting the bevels even is the reason a saber grind is harder to do than a full flat grind.  Drawfiling really helps even things out if you use a big enough file to start with.  

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Posted (edited)

I mean even though it’s not straight I’m surprised at how sharp the blade edge is.  Even though I’ve yet put it to a sharpening stone.  The full flat grind thats basically going all the way up to the spine instead of halfway right?  I'm almost wondering if it would be easier to burn the tang shape into the scales rather than carving it out with a dremmel is that the best way to do that?  Of course that would be before hardening.

Edited by AndrewB

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Okay I admit I think I screwed up the handle LOL OPPS.  I was experimenting with some stuff with the wood. and welp I didn't realize I didn't have a lot of space between the tang and edge of the wood.  I was trying to do a finger rest in the handle.  I failed epically.  I mean it's still turned out nice with that one minor discrepancy.  Gah what a NOOB move.  I was also trying to see how far down I could sand the scales down while still having room to play with it getting it into the higher grits.

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On 4/26/2019 at 1:22 PM, AndrewB said:

I dunno why but quenching and tempering have just been to be so easy for me it's not even funny.  I dunno why so many others have issues with it.

How do you know your blade was fully hardened? Did you test it with a rockwell hardness tester/files/etc? Do you know what your grain looks like? How did you judge your temperature?

My point is, just because you heated it up and dipped it in oil and it seems a bit harder doesn't mean that it's a good heat treat. There's a lot going on in that piece of steel in heat treating (and during forging). I would caution you against getting too confident in that area. You may think it went perfectly well and it may be a shattered blade waiting to happen. I'm not sure what steel you were using but the steels around the eutectic point are the easiest. 1075/1084/etc... Basically steels that are pretty close to 0.77ish percent carbon (and lacking higher amounts of other alloying elements). They don't require a soak and can be heated and quenched immediately.

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I'll have to make a blade one of these days and attempt to break it in half after I do a quench just to see what the grain structure looks like.

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