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As a rank newbie, I hesitate to comment, but my thought was also about the flow, but going in the opposite direction of Geoff's  idea - drop the point. We came to the same conclusion, but with a different solution...

Edited by Ron Benson
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Here's a similar pattern that I am working on.   Maybe this will help with your design concept

D2 steel.jpg

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Interesting... and I know that the design is meant to fit the task. And the task is not yet determined for this one, which is turning out to be a problem. I had the same thought about straightening it out, but it just didn't sit right on paper. I may have to set this one aside and let it marinate for a while before coming back to it. 

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Over the past few years I have a few different projects that have been left in the marinating hopper...

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I can't work Paint drawings worth a darn, but here is my poor attempt at tweaking the design.

1.jpeg

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With a distal taper to the blade, a full flat grind shouldn't be a problem with this profile - though the plunge line will most likely look different.

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You old timers and experienced gents will laugh, but think about the intended use of the  knife, not good artistic looks.   Sort of a red neck approach.   After all I was born in the swamps of Georgia, USA!  

I  use the skinner with my index finger along the point of the blade, gives better control and reduces hide cuts.   The shapes below have served me well in deer and elk out here in the Pacific Northwest.  A plus is when you have the knife in one hand, both hands up in the chest cavity cutting out lungs, windpipe and other things you know where the tip of the  blade is and do not wack your off knife hand.  Done that in the past with a bigger, heavy knife.  I have found that with my hand and all fingers wrapped around the handle I have less control.  The handle is curved to fit my closed palm.  The blades are thin and light.

These are just utility blades guys, not showpieces.

GmUzqk3.jpg

 

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The 4 in the upper left are patterns.

sh469Mo.jpg

 

My thoughts on a lanyard or thong hole in the handle:   Useless.   I lost a prized knife many years ago, foolishly had the knife on a sheath on the belt, and was tracking through some thick brush.   Got to a clearing for a rest, the knife was gone!     Snatched by a snag or limb thanks to the thong loop, pulled it right out of the sheath.   After that the knives were tucked away in my pack.

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@John Ricks I do like your point of holding the knife blade inside of a closed palm. I’d explain it as it you were going to throw the knife like a little frisbee, that’s how you’d grasp it. And very correct when saying you need to know where the tip is, because when you’re up inside a whitetail, you don’t always have the benefit of seeing where you’re working. 

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This was my first knife a couple years ago. It has since skinned several deer and elk. Looks to be about the same shape your looking for. I left a lanyard hole in it because it is a “three finger knife” and sometimes it’s nice to have a lanyard to hold, but I’ve never found I needed it. I also hold the blade cupped in my hand with my index finger on the spine, makes for good control. I too carry it in my pack, never been much for the knife hanging off my belt look...

C77044BF-EF63-499D-99E9-964F1AFAE13F.jpeg

Edited by Adam Weller
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