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Recently I cut some beams with a chainsaw for a small cabin I am building but I didn't like the saw marks on the beams.  So to make the beams look hand-hewn, I figured I would make a small adze to get rid of the saw marks.  This is my first adze and, for me, it was a lot more difficult than making a small hatchet. I drifted and shaped the body out of 1" x 3/4" mild and then added a 1075 steel bit to the underside.  Not having a notch to insert the bit like in axe, I just placed it on the underside of the mild body.  I didn't tack weld it down since I wanted to get the body close to temp and then add the bit in order to reduce the risk of overheating the high carbon bit. Well, as you can see from the crappy phone pics, managing to keep the shape symmetrical and having a smooth transition from mild to HC eluded me.  While it is ugly and has flaws, it works well enough to hew wood.  I will definitively have to make another one (maybe a bowl adze this time?) and apply the lessons I learned on this one.  If anyone else has made one and has advice, please share.

ugly adze2.png

ugly adze1.png

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Other than I might have forged down the thickness of mild steel towards the pole I really don't see much wrong with that.  It also got the job done so it's functional.

Doug

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Thanks Doug.  I tapered both the mild and HC bit - what bugs me is that I didn't control the thickness at the weld very well.  I was hoping to have a uniform taper instead of the abrupt flattened area towards the edge...lesson learned for next time.  

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Yeah,Mike,i think you've done a great job.

I'm with Doug on the poll,since you followed this neat old pattern,and did so good with it too,it'd make sense if the top also followed that same arc as the blade.

Otherwise,if it works to your satisfaction-Fantastic-right on!

 

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Thanks Jake, I think you and Doug are right, thinning down the body nearer the poll and matching the arc would not only make more aesthetic sense, but I think it would allow me to blend the body and HC bit weld in smoothly.

 

Alan,  thanks for the link....and your ability to recall practically every post on this forum is a little scary (and impressive)!  Bob's adze turned out beautiful and I definitely will thin down the next one.  For this one I was thinking that if I kept more mass near the handle it would perform better.  I should know better than to second guess tried and true patterns:rolleyes:.

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Look fine to me.

On advice, you might already know this, others might not.

Bevels: How you're planning on using the adze will determine which side of the blade to put the bevel.  If I remember correctly, for hewing and planing, bevel is on the inside.  For deeper cutting, such as bowls, the bevel is on the outside.

Welding: Putting the high carbon bit on the top of the mild steel is a common method. The mild/wrought shields the hcb, and by the time the mild is ready to weld, so is the hcb. Preheating the mild helps, but isn't always necessary. I find you need to hammer the hcb side about twice as much as on the other. If not, you may find the mild spreading over the sides of the hcb and possibly shearing the weld.

Please take this with a grain of salt, as my knowledge is small and experience limited to about a 1/2 dozen adzes.

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1 hour ago, MikeDT said:

Alan.... your ability to recall practically every post on this forum is a little scary (and impressive)

I've thought this for a number of years.....

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Thanks Gerald - you have 6 times the experience that I have:D.    I put an outside bevel on mine because I wanted to texture the beams and not necessarily make them "smooth".  I figured the outside bevel would allow me to quickly eliminate just the chainsaw marks without having to work the entire surface.

I put my HC on the underside and almost flush with the edge of the mild, thinking that the lower cutting edge would always be HC and I would have a larger surface area to weld, instead of doing a shorter overlap for the weld seam.  Putting it on top makes sense. Did you tack weld the bit initially?  I set the weld and did most of the forging with the underside facing up, if that makes sense. 

I'll have to try it the way you suggested and see how that compares, thanks.

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I think we're on the same sheet of music.  I just lay the HC on top and hold it steady.  This is one of the few times I flux inside the fire, too hard to get it out and back in without shifting the HC.

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