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Finding Inspiration


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I guess that inspiration is where you find it and only in the eye  of the beholder.  :)  Recently I saw this photo online.  Though I have no idea of if it's rock or mineral or something  else, it inspired me to create a new technique for making mosaics.  The closest that I  can describe it would be a controlled random mosaic.  I'm not sure yet if this will require a can or not but either way should be fun creating.

A secondary plus for this is it gives me a use for the small drop-offs & scraps of damascus that I've  had laying around the shop for some time.

 

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Edited by Gary Mulkey
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When I looked at the picture I started seeing stuff that I know isn't there. So, if you happen to need a name for this I vote for " Rorschach Damascus". 

Edited by Will Drake
Still can't spell
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For  this pattern I'm going to forge the scraps of various different Damascus patterns into different geometric  shapes (squares, rectangles & triangles) and then selectively stack & weld  them into a mosaic pattern.  I got a couple rough forged into  triangles this morning.  Once I get enough of each geometric shape I will cut them into 2"  pieces for stacking.

 

 

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I got the pieces for this billet rough forged today before the afternoon heat brought me to a stop.  They still need to have the scale removed and ground to a tighter fit.  I think that once tack welded together tightly that I will be able to weld this one without a can.

 

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y still

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My wife is fond of having quilts made from old t-shirts that have been kept for the sake of a memory.

This is sort of the same thing with steel :)

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14 hours ago, Adam Weller said:

That is plasticine and I recognize it from an Owen Bush Instagram post a couple days ago.

Is that from the the arctic fire demo a year or two ago?

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Gary, you are taking scrapmascus to a new level. I have a box full of little bits myself...….hmmmm. Finding inspiration in the Mulkey medley.

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I finally got around  to getting all of  these pieces welded today.  My first attempt was by simply tack  welding the pieces together with my MIG and working w/o a can.  This didn't work at all so I had to disassemble all of the pieces, grind them clean again and put them in a can (canoe).  To this I added some 1084 powder to fill in any gaps as well as to add a bit of a solid steel border to the billet.

 

 

 

 

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My next step will be to remove the can and forge the billet to a shape for doing a Ferry Flip (or tile cut).

 

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How do you remove the can? Do you use whiteout? I have only done 2 canister welds and both times I just welded the can to it and ground it off using a 9 inch grinder.

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1 hour ago, Jeremy Blohm said:

How do you remove the can? Do you use whiteout? I have only done 2 canister welds and both times I just welded the can to it and ground it off using a 9 inch grinder.

White out works best

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I've also heard that you can buy titanium dioxide powder and mix it with water and its as effective, and cheaper too... I haven't tried it myself though.

 

$15 for a pound seems pretty cheap... https://www.amazon.com/Pure-Organic-Ingredients-Eco-Friendly-Packaging/dp/B01N6R7MS5/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=FHCKVFWKZZ7G&keywords=titanium+dioxide+powder&qid=1559625499&s=gateway&sprefix=titanium+di%2Caps%2C228&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

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I got the can removed and a quick grind & etch mainly to make sure that I had the square billet oriented correctly before forging it into a bar.  Right now it measures 1 1/2 x 2 x 15 so it should yield multiple blades.  (You can see a small occlusion in this pic but the billet is so large that it will grind  out  easily.)

 

By welding this in a can with 1084 powder it gave the billet a different look but I'm still pleased with the result.  It should make  some interesting blades with each one being quite different as the pattern in the billet changes greatly from end to  end.

 

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Another Gary Mulkey thread to make sure I crowd my e-mail with notifications for updates....

 

Out of curiosity, could something like this be done (or has anyone here ever tried this) by forging a layered billet as normal, then as one cuts, stacks, folds, draws out, etc. to increase layer count, occasionally rotating the stock or layers in the stack 90 degrees, and/or randomly twisting the stock?  Or folding the stock 90 degrees opposed to doubling the layer count?

 

 

 

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45 minutes ago, billyO said:

 

 

Out of curiosity, could something like this be done (or has anyone here ever tried this) by forging a layered billet as normal, then as one cuts, stacks, folds, draws out, etc. to increase layer count, occasionally rotating the stock or layers in the stack 90 degrees, and/or randomly twisting the stock?  Or folding the stock 90 degrees opposed to doubling the layer count?

 

 

 

Certainly.  Be sure to show us some photos when you do it.

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11 hours ago, Gary Mulkey said:

Certainly.  Be sure to show us some photos when you do it.

I'd love too!!! I even have 2 billets of 23 layers each with the initial weld set.  Unfortunately, I sold my house and my shop and tools currently in storage.

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