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Square up


Mike Ward

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I just wanted to ask how, after forging, you get your ricasso area flat and square/parallel to each other. And how close do you call it, within a thousandth? Less? Do you use files and patience? Sandpaper and a flat surface? Disc grinders on low speed? Belt grinder? 

I’ve done it with my grizzly 2x72 freehand before and spent today with files working on another. Just wondering if people have ways that work for them that might work for me. 

Thanks

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My forging skills have gotten much better and I now use a planishing hammer to get the sides pretty flat and parallel. To get the top and bottoms of the ricasso parallel, I simply use a straight edge and grind to the scribed line.

Here's how I suggest you do the entire rough grind operation.

If you do not have a surface grinder, simply repeat the flattening on the 2x72 on the other side.

Edited by Joshua States

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

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On 5/28/2019 at 4:44 AM, Alan Longmire said:

I just eyeball it.  

There is that.

I generally like my ricasso to be either 1 inch or 3/4 inch from spine to choil depending on the blade size. So once I get the spine straight. I just use a straight edge (I have two steel rulers, one is 1" wide the other 3/4") to scribe a line to grind to. As for uniform thickness, a surface grinder helps, but if you don't have one, just try and make sure the sides bevel the same as each other. A lot of my ricassos are not the same thickness at the spine as they are at the choil. I really don't like deep plunge cuts so I taper my ricasso a little. It makes fitting the guard a little trickier, but I have a solution for that too. I cut 4 shoulders in my tang to fit the guard to. That way it doesn't matter if the ricasso cross section is a rectangle, a trapezoid, or a diamond shape. it all fits up against the face of the guard seamlessly.

“So I'm lightin' out for the territory, ahead of the scared and the weak and the mean spirited, because Aunt Sally is fixin’ to adopt me and civilize me, and I can't stand it. I've been there before.”

The only bad experience is the one from which you learn nothing.  

 

Josh

http://www.dosgatosdesignsllc.com/#!

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdJMFMqnbLYqv965xd64vYg

J.States Bladesmith | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dos.gatos.71

https://www.etsy.com/shop/JStatesBladesmith

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7 hours ago, Joshua States said:

I cut 4 shoulders in my tang to fit the guard to.

I’ve seen that done before and I’ve been meaning to try it, but the blades I’ve been making are not thick enough to do it. I did go back and watched all of your videos and I think starting with thicker stock for a bigger blade would let me not have to hit the ricasso area as much. And/or make a flatter to try.

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