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Conner Michaux

how do you find inspiration and WIP

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Why didn’t I think of that...   I will go do that now, and then during the normalizing, I’m gonna use my shwacker and put a slight bow in the blade, this one is gonna be one heck of a slicer, I want to do one of them empty soda can cut tests. I’ve got some rope in My garage too. 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Dont bend up your tang too bad! That's a short blade, you might have trouble trying to shwack it. Btw, now would be a great time to clean up the upper ridge of that pitting. Unless you like the look. 

Keep at it man! Looking good so far!

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20 minutes ago, Zeb Camper said:

Btw, now would be a great time to clean up the upper ridge of that pitting

Pitting? 

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Oh I’m gonna have to file in a small Choil as well,  or the first 16th of an inch off the ricasso won’t be sharpened. 

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Idk, looks like rust or "pitting" (little divots) there on the ricasso/spine area. Might be minor surface stuff, but looks bad from here idk. 

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It’s just a little surface rust.   I clean the steel before I start to file on it and I forgot to dry it off. 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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That looks different than what I bought, but should be the same stuff.  I find it useful, but "worth it" is a personal decision.

It allows me to heat treat without having to worry about dimensions changing due to having to remove much metal by cleaning off the scale.

I still have to polish, but can start by hand with 220 grit after heat treat.

A jar that size will last a long time.

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I’m getting pretty good at this hand sanding thing. Still can’t figure out how to get the scratches out of the  plunge though. 

B46EA791-9E05-4C18-AFC5-C48DE5A5A70C.jpeg

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On 6/30/2019 at 5:55 PM, Conner Michaux said:

I'm working on a very exciting project and this stuff/ or similar product was recommended for me me to use to limit the scale build up.  

When it comes to starting out and feeling you don't have the right tools, sometimes that's because we think a job can only be done with the bigger expensive or hard to find tools.  I ground out my first blades with a bench grinder and files.  Those knives were very crude. What changed was my level of skill over a little time, and a passion to make something better each time.  Never doubt the power of the file, it can hog off material rather well, but also be very precise.

In response of your original question of inspiration and where I personally find it.  Historical blades is a good start, but as I've been finding and befriending other local smithy's, their work overall inspires me.  Getting the chance to get out and talk with blade smiths. Holding their product in hand, and having a conversation over it sometimes leads me to make something similar never copied.  That actually sort of a part of this current project I'm excited over. 

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IM gonna try to heat treat it tonight without the stuff that helps prevent decarb, I’ve hardened v2 before to the point where you could say, “what Grain?” So let’s hope I do the same today

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8 hours ago, Conner Michaux said:

I’m getting pretty good at this hand sanding thing. Still can’t figure out how to get the scratches out of the  plunge though. 

 

I wind sanding paper around something with about the same radius as the plunge, better to do that first and then blend the sanding on the flat into that.

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I always use a chainsaw file after grinding to get a nice radiused inner surface. Then I clamp my sandpaper to angle iron. I wrap it around the angle iron and then tighten the vise around it. The end of the angle is radiused and I just bump the plunge into it as I hand sand the bevel.

Looks really good btw!

Edited by Zeb Camper

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Thanks!  He scratches are really shallow, they just have a little water rust in them,  I’ve seen that the really shallow scratches come out with the forge scale. It’s been atleast 100 degrees in my shed that past few days, so sanding has gone by as quick as possible. 

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Blade is tempering heat treat was success

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I hardened it by color, I know thats not a good idea, but i dropped both my magnets into the forge and melted them, And ive never been able to spot decalisense (how ever you spell it) . so my only way to know was by color (which isnt very accurate) .  And I ended up with a slight bit of decarb, but i filed that off in 30 seconds.

 

this is what i used instead.... Now I knew what color it had to be, I just wanted to make sure.

 heat-treat-colors-copy.jpg

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If you are doing things by eye (rather than thermocouple), I'd highly recommend spending whatever time it takes to get good at seeing decalescence and recalescence.  A similar chart to that is on the cover of my copy of the ASM Heat Treater's Guide, and I really wish those charts would go away.  Your magnets are better off melted than being used for HT control.  Control your ambient light in order to HT by eye.  1500 degree steel looks very different at high noon (on a sunny day), dusk, and pitch black night.  

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I usually heat treat at night,  Im gonna have to get A thermo couple, Ive tried seeing decalescence 6 times now, But im using charcoal in my forge so theres tons of flame and some smoke, so its quite difficult. (for me atleast)

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Are you using a muffle pipe?

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Dont forget you can pull the blade out to look at it now and then. If you can't get your forge turned down low enough, (you should) then you need to be moving that thing around to get even heat anyway. If you can get it low enough a muffle pipe is the way to go. 

I wish I could show you. Need a camera. 

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Muffle pipe is just a regular pipe to put the knife in right?   Yeah I use one of those.   But my eye sight is pretty bad even with glasses. And when there’s fire around and inside the pipe it’s really hard for me to be able to see anything but orange. 

 

On the bright side,  the knife hardened amazingly! I tempered I for 4 hours three cycles at 400 and the file skates even when I press it into the blade.

Edited by Conner Michaux

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One end needs to be closed. You can just get the pipe you got hot and smash one end shut. 

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Okay, thanks.    I’m gonna have to put this one on the back burner for a few month or so, I really need to start my kith,  I’m gonna try to make a Yakut for it, and as a write this, I’m realizing that the blade will have to be 3 inches or less.. Small Yakut I guess.   So I’ll be back to this WIP shortly 

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Zen, why does one end need to be closed?

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