Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This is kind of getting addictive.  my 2nd and 3rd attempts at a slip-joint.  I'm still pretty much just using Culver's design, but have been experimenting with using a pivot bushing, and how much clearance to leave to allow for a nice snappy action.  I'll probably start taking more liberties with the overall design now.  Both have blades from a mosaic bar I made for this purpose a few weeks ago, and nickel silver pins and bolsters.

I still have much to learn, but each of these has been a significant improvement over the previous one.

The first has stag scales and will be a birthday gift for my daughter's boyfriend.  (Yeah I know, but he is a good guy and I really like him in spite of my fatherly instincts :)

The second has jigged bone scales (I just bought the slabs already jigged), and is now my new EDC pocket knife.

 

IMG_20190622_131100372_HDR.jpg

 

IMG_20190623_150914.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Lookin' good!  I'm almost through with my first one, and it will not be the last either.  Same design, just 0-1 and jigged bone.  Not stag bone, Catalina from Culpepper & sons.  It will be my KITH knife.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, definitely impressive work for your 2nd and 3rd attempts - very clean and precise looking... as well as attractive over all.

 

While I have made friction folders before, I have never tackled a slip joint.  Looking at Steve Culver's website tutorials he uses some high end equipment.  From what I have read, making decent slip joints seem to necessitate precision equipment and has thus delayed me taking the plunge.  I don't believe that lacking fancy equipment prevents one from making good knives (overwhelming evidence of this by many talented smiths), but precision equipment seem to be pretty common for making quality folders. 

Brian, is Steve's book helpful if you are limited to a grinder and drill press as the most high end equipment in your shop? 

Is there a good book out there that shows how to make good slip joints without anything fancier than a drill press?

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

With Steve's method all you need is a drill press and a couple of reamers.  You just have to buy precision ground bar stock to avoid having to get a surface grinder.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MikeDT said:

Brian, is Steve's book helpful if you are limited to a grinder and drill press as the most high end equipment in your shop?

Alan is right.  Steve assumes all you have is a drill press.  Reamers help, but aren't absolutely necessary.

I've built all of these with just a crappy benchtop drill press other than the time I borrowed on a friend's surface grinder to get my initial bar an even thickness.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Brian Dougherty said:

Thanks Alan.  I hope you plan to post some in-progress shots of your KITH ;)

 

Too late for that, sorry.  I didn't want to do another fail blog.  :lol:. And it's not too late to fail!  Final assembly is this weekend :ph34r:!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian, I like what your doing with these folders. It looks like you have found a niche in you talent stream!

Gary LT

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Stuart Johnson said:

Very nice! I have slip joints on my radar, any chance you could post a link to the book of Steve's you are talking about?

Sure!

https://www.amazon.com/Slip-joint-Folder-Designing-Building-Culver/dp/1545388326/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=steve+culver&qid=1561722053&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Link to post
Share on other sites

These are most impressive for you initial couple of knives. I do have one suggestion to make regarding pin placement. (I know, I'm a nit-noid about pins)

IMNSHO: The rear pin is too close to the edge and the center pins need to be aligned with the point in the belly of the handle.

One more suggestion is to move the nail nick closer to the point to provide more leverage when opening the blade.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...