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Cason Hicks

Royalloy

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Posted (edited)

So I’ve got a chance to get ahold of some Royalloy (which I’ve never heard of). Found a super nice guy through my livestreaming who has 4 chunks of the stuff who will send them to me for free if I pay shipping. Never heard of the stuff, but here’s the composition (see pic). It’s been sitting outside in the dirt for 4 years he said. Sure doesn’t look like it, which make me think it’s some type of stainless alloy? 

Is this hardenable? Or will it just make beautiful bolsters/guards? Any help is appreciated. 

Also, here is a link to the product brochure: https://www.uddeholm.com/app/uploads/sites/54/2018/05/Tech-Uddeholm-RoyAlloy-EN.pdf.pdf

Reading over it, it seems hardenable. What is the HRC equivalent of 310-320 HB?

4DBF1A13-0118-4C26-BB2B-5D2C0F7C7B08.jpeg

347709A3-14A6-41E9-8845-810B5FBB4CDA.jpeg

024D0B9B-E4AD-41DC-9306-A01DC7024BD1.png

Edited by Cason Hicks
Added info

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With only .05% carbon, I don't believe you'll be hardening it any time soon... 

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I agree with Eric, with only 0.05% carbon it's not going to harden.  That's less than low carbon railroad spikes.  With the chromium content just below 15% it's not stainless.  I'd call it near stainless which will make it difficult to impossible to weld.

Doug

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How much Nitrogen?

That would explain the stainless and might harden....?

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Posted (edited)

Might wanna review the specs for 5160. Looks like a tough steel to me. Idk how that much chrome will make it behave, nor the complexity of HT...

Edit: Oh, its .05%... I see that I've misread that....Yeah, good luck!

Edited by Zeb Camper

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@Gerhard Gerber The brochure only says N + so I'm not sure what that means, as this is the first info sheet I've ever really looked at for metallurgic properties. The guy said he simply grabbed it from outside and wiped it with a rag and WD40 to get the finish in the pics. It seems that this may be destined for handle and bolster material, which is perfectly fine. This is going to be 44 pounds of known quality steel for $20 shipping

 image.png

The brochure also points out that the steel is delivered prehardened and tempered to 320 HB (which the Google says is about 34-35 HRC)

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If you read the whole datasheet, it's designed for plastic and rubber molding and extrusion and they consider it to be stainless.  They also say it can be TIG welded with no heat affected zone, the welding will leave it at its maximum hardness of 35 HRC.  They do suggest a stress-relief temper on intricate parts.  

At any rate, it'll be fine for bolsters and other furniture.  Looks like it will take a decent polish and keep it.

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Posted (edited)

Just to add a little info...

It is most certainly stainless, as evidenced by the condition it is in, but also because it only takes about 13% (some say 12%) free chrome to make something "stainless".  That is why the carbon is kept so low, to prevent chrome carbides from forming and taking up the chrome.  And this is the website that I always reference for hardness conversion, though technically ASTM E140 would be a bit more "respectable".  

Edited by Jerrod Miller
Clarity.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks guys. I am pretty excited to have a low cost chance to play with thicker metal for furniture. Should make some good looking additions, and at an excellent price. Again... 44 lbs for $20 ain't too shabby

Edited by Cason Hicks

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For that kind of money you can't go wrong.  It sounds like the alloy was designed to be easy to machine for mold tooling.  If it really is, then you'll have a great supply of steel that will be easy to shape compared to 300 series stainless.

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Nitrogen (if there truly is some) also helps with the stainless part. Nitrides(I think it's how it's called) fill the pores in the steel making it much more resistant to pitting. 

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Thanks fellas. I've never really looked into the metallurgy side of things, so this is all relatively new to me.

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