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Brian Dougherty

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Here is yet another folder from me.  This is the 5th one, and I am finally starting to get the hang of it.  Another dozen or so, and I may actually get good at it.

I've been using the same basic design, and focusing on making mechanical adjustments.  The last few have all had pivot bushings to keep the knife from tightening up too much as I peen the pins.  I made this bushing from A2, but the first couple I made from bearing bronze.

I've also been fine tuning the process of peening the pins so that they disappear in the bolsters.  I'm pretty happy with the action on this one, and plan to start making my own design for the next one.  I'm liking the old-school aesthetic these have, and am leaning towards a Coke-bottle, or Barlow look in my sketches.

If I have any success with my own design, I'll do a WIP and share the mechanical design details.

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Posted (edited)

Nicely done sir! I dig the double lines on the bolsters (how'd you do that, is that filed?) and the file work is nice and consistent.

The only thing I am not fond of, has to do with Culver's design and the pivot pin placement. There is a lot of the heel for the spring shelf sticking out of the body when the blade is closed. I know why Steve does that. It's to displace the little pocket that may collect lint when the knife is in your pocket. It's a trade off really, but I like to make that blade spine come right into the bolster rather than have this sharp corner sticking out.

This is the relationship I get with a higher pin placement.

2019 KITH (7)V2.jpg

This is the lint pocket (sorry it's so blurry)

Pocket V2.jpg

 

Edited by Joshua States
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I commend you both for going this route, I know my tooling isnt up to snuff for projects like this, and both of those are awesome..... 

 

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I liked and left, but I'm back to admit I'm a bit jealous.....

Am I correct there's more of a market for traditional slip joints that 90% of the stuff 90% of us make?

I'm scared to even try, but perhaps with my current equipment failures it's a good time......

To be clear, pattern welded swords are wonderful, but for me a slip joint with a jigged bone handle seems like the pinnacle of this trade.

I'm less scared of the pattern welded sword :lol:   

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8 hours ago, Joshua States said:

Nicely done sir! I dig the double lines on the bolsters (how'd you do that, is that filed?) and the file work is nice and consistent.

Thanks Josh!  The lines on the bolsters are just filed in with an 1/8" round file.  I recently gave in to my aging eyes, and started using one of those opti-visor type of things.  It is a game changer.

I generally agree about the exposure of the spring shelf, although the look is kind of growing on me.  Covering up that angle is one of the reasons I have been doodling some coke-bottle designs in my notebook lately.

  @Robert D. & @Gerhard Gerber  Don't be put off by the lack of tooling.  With two exceptions the only power tools I used to make any of my folders have been a 2x72 grinder and a drill press.

The exceptions: I have a lathe that I used to make my own pivot bushings.  You could just buy these, or not use a bushing at all. (My first one didn't)  I have also been borrowing time on a friends surface grinder to make my steel flat before cutting out the blades and springs.  It's pretty important to get them the same thickness, but you could just buy steel that is already ground.  I've also been surprised how fast I can adjust the thickness of a spring by a thou or two just with sandpaper and a marble slab.

I don't know what people sell these for Gerhard.  I make knives because of my job, not for it. (I need the stress relief)  I'm sure knife makers with a pedigree (name recognition) get pretty good money from folders, but suspect the money is mostly in the tacti-cool assisted flipper/opening market.  I doubt that a mutt like me making traditional slip-joints would command much of a price. 

 

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Nice!  I am on my second, so I know what you mean about how addictive they are.  The only problem is holding on to the blade while grinding and finishing, but only because I haven't made a portable handle thingy like Josh's.

Robert: I used only a 2x72 and a drill press, and bought precision ground flat bar.  These are not that hard to do!  A bit fiddly on the fit, but if you get Culver's book the patterns are already there for you.  

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I need a new drill press, one of my current challenges, is the way the work table mounts and moves, its one of the cheapo harbor freight models so the work table surface has a slight tilt to the front side of it. Which means I spend more time with a level and shims under my press vise then I do actually drilling on it.  Took me about 2 hours to get each scale of my KITH friction folder trued up so the holes were straight. 

At least my Grizzly has done me no wrongs yet...

 

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4 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

I doubt that a mutt like me making traditional slip-joints would command much of a price. 

I have a theory that any decent, hand-made, knife is worth a minimum of $150 US. Damascus adds to the price as does file work and bling. Don't short sell these folders. 

The truth about pricing your work is this: If you don't think it's worth that much, nobody else will either. If anyone asks me why I think it's worth as much as I'm asking, my standard answer is "Because I made it. Who better to determine the value/worth than the guy who made it?"

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I wholeheartedly agree.  My standard answer when someone asks how long it took me to make a fancy pipe hawk is "oh, about twenty years so far.  This particular one took a month of weekends, but the two hundred before that are what gave me the experience to do this one the way it is."  If it's someone who agrees it's worth the price but then says they can't afford it, I just smile and say "neither can I, that's why I learned to make 'em."

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Josh & Alan, I agree wholeheartedly with your sentiments, but didn't have the clever responses to give people (until now :) )

If I were to put this knife up for sale, I'd price it at $300, and feel I was selling it too cheaply in my heart.  Fortunately, this one is a birthday gift for my father-in-law :)

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4 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

oh, about twenty years so far

I'm going to have to wait a few years before I can use this one :lol:. But thanks Alan and Joshua! 

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5 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

I wholeheartedly agree.  My standard answer when someone asks how long it took me to make a fancy pipe hawk is "oh, about twenty years so far.  This particular one took a month of weekends, but the two hundred before that are what gave me the experience to do this one the way it is."  If it's someone who agrees it's worth the price but then says they can't afford it, I just smile and say "neither can I, that's why I learned to make 'em."

Love this and I will adopt the "That's why I learned to make them" bit.

When they ask me how long it took to make it, I usually reply "12 years.....just to develop the skillset."

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