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Which power hammer build

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These are great hammers, I've worked on several different ones.  The real flaw in them, IMHO, is that they have all of the mass of the tire and motor suspended way up in the air, on the end of a single post, so some whip and sway can happen.  A design that puts those elements on the ground is better, buy that is just my opinion.  A Rusty style hammer fixes that issue,  There isn't  much to  choose between them.  A Clontz is taller, but with a small footprint.  A Rusty is shorter, but longer.   https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=rusty+style+power+hammer&FORM=HDRSC2

 

Geoff

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I really like the Ken Kitzur power hammers and will build a kit from his parts some time soon, they have a very unique action.

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Are these a UK based company Owen?

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 The Ken Kitzur power hammer appears to be a great machine.  The single strike capability and the long stroke are great features.  Do you have any idea what the cost of a build will be?

Geoff 

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https://youtu.be/5WMwJ1qpApU

Here is the one I built; it has some ideas from others i have seen as well as some original ideas. The main parts of the frame and the hydraulic cylinder were industrial scrap, in keeping with the junkyard hammer theme.

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Posted (edited)

The tire hammer you show in the video, I use one at my local shop a lot.  50lb ram weight.

It's got more punch than what I expected, and fast!  Which in my experiences with hammers, mechanical hammers are faster than a pneumatic, but less control.   Self contained pneumatic, I haven't gotten to use one yet, but understand their the best of both worlds.

Things I notice about the local shop's tire hammer, is slop in the dies.  Really noticeable when working in the dies length wise as that little bit of play kicks material out of the stroke. Working on the dies the shot way, don't notice it much at all. Get an occasional kick but it's easily recoverable. Their is also very little adjustable in them as the break is just by a friction plate. So the motor only pulls at one speed and once the plate lets go, it's just gone.  Can be a hassle for delicate stuff.  I can get the one I use to tap, but if that break slips, I might get a hard and fast slap where I don't want it. All that may be adjustable, but I'm not sure.  

 

Edited by Daniel W

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