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Jon Bishop

Fiebing’s leather dye

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Hello all. I’ve just started venturing into leather dye for my leather projects. How can you all get consistent results with your dye? The two projects I’ve done this on have given me splotchy results. I have four different shades from light brown, medium, dark and mahogany. They all look the same shade. The attached picture shows them from left to right. Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks, Jon

2C3744D9-7ACF-4A6B-AD3C-397B2F7E60C3.jpeg

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That's because they are pretty much the same color to begin with, except mahogany has a little red to it.  I tend to use British Tan for all my browns, multiple coats makes it darker.  

As for splotchiness, to avoid that apply the dye while the leather is ever so slightly damp.  As in, wet a sponge and wring out all the water you can, then wipe that over the leather.  Once the surface is a uniform color, paint on the dye.  If it stays splotchy with just water, you have something on the leather.  Wipe off with acetone and try again.

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I've strayed away from Feibling's dyes recently in favor of Eco-Flo Waterstain dye. Feibling like Alan said has very little variation with the colors, and all their browns are almost the same shade. 

Another more expensive method I've used to get a more uniform application of dye is to use an airbrush. I do that for when I add a sunburst affect around the edge, but I've also noticed its easier to avoid splotches that way. I would follow Alan's advice first though. Doesn't require extra pricey tools that way.

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Thank you for the replies. I’ll do a test piece with the method you described. Up until recently I have been putting multiple coats of neatsfoot oil on everything to achieve color. The eco-flo from tandy looks like great stuff. I watched their you tube video and will be ordering some in the near future. Thanks again!

Jon

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If I am dying a sheath all the same color, I do not apply the dye with a felt dauber. I pour the dye into a tray and submerge the sheath in the dye the same way Chuck Burrows did. It's only when I have multiple colors on a sheath that I apply using the daubers. In this case, I am intending there to be variations and crossover between the colors, so I do not mind the differences.

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1 hour ago, Joshua States said:

If I am dying a sheath all the same color, I do not apply the dye with a felt dauber. I pour the dye into a tray and submerge the sheath in the dye the same way Chuck Burrows did. It's only when I have multiple colors on a sheath that I apply using the daubers. In this case, I am intending there to be variations and crossover between the colors, so I do not mind the differences.

I used a dauber on the the two projects I used the dye on. A guitar strap and a gun holster. Both being made for me. When you submerge the leather do you mean before stitching? The holster I made, I applied the dye after all tooling and stitching were done. 

Thanks, Jon

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18 hours ago, Jon Bishop said:

When you submerge the leather do you mean before stitching?

For knife sheaths, belts, etc., I submerge when everything is done.

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