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Will Urban

First crucible steel puck going for wootz.

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So in a different route from my typical bloom smelting I built a propane furnace to make some crucible steel. I mixed brown glass with wrought iron and cast iron from the bloom furnaces with 80crv2 for the added alloying along with some crushed charcoal. All together 900 grams of iron and steel resulted in 600 gram puck I'm pretty excited to try forging this down. Although I will be working in a coal forge with a great bellows and hand hammering. This will certainly be a project.

On a weird note I didnt get a reading at all on the psi gauge for the burner I just adjusted everything by sight and sound.

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I forgot to add that I did do the calculations on the to get the rough carbon percentage around 1.6 percent

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I wonder why you lost so much weight ? Generally, I would not lose more than a few tens of grams on crucible steels.

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I'm thinking it's because I used bloomery iron and whatever I lost was into the glass as slag

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Sounds reasonable.  Good-looking puck, too!

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Hey all,

The second run seems much more promising. I do have one question regarding forging these. How Important is thermal cycling at the beginning and is there a difference in terms of fuels for forging ie. Propane coal or charcoal for which is better. I started forging the first of them in a coal forge.

Thanks

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Hello again. 

So I tried forging out the first puck with I'd say rather poor success. I thermo cycled the puck 6 times before beginning to forge it above the acm down to cool to the touch. Then tried to keep the puck around a medium to dull orange never working that long before reheating understanding there is a narrow forging window. I am working to get a propane forge with a way to gauge temp rather than working in an 1800s living history museum with a coal forge and by eye temperature.

While I am still working in this manner does anyone have any tips on keeping this material more workable and less likely to crumble or crack.

I am wondering if the material itself is too high of carbon or if I'm not trying to forge it correctly being mostly from boom iron there is some guessing involved.

I'm including two pictures of the aftermath a large loss of material.

 

Also if anyone has any suggestions for where to look to get metals tested for chemical composition I'd be very curious to know where you source your lab tests from.

 

Thank you

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Wish I could help, man. :(  All I know to tell you is to read all the wootz posts here and in the pinned B&B forum, but I am sure you've done that already.

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Thanks Alan I have many times over as well as watched any videos with al pendray I also bought John verhoevens book and read it cover to cover all of these options help put the puzzle together but without testing these somehow I feel there is still too much guessing involved. Without knowing the carbon I don't know if I can accurately gauge anything from forging temps to colors. I think after talking to mark green this may even affect the amount of time needed to soak and to thermo cycle. 

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