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Carl Brill

How to attach brass back strip?

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Hi, I'm wondering how folks go about attaching back strips to the spines of bowies and other knives. I've seen them riveted on but more of them are not riveted. So are they sweated on? or you could cut longitudinal grooves on either side of the spine and peen the strip into the grooves before dressing it back....? I dunno.

I did six different searches here on the forum so either I don't understand the search or it's so obvious that no one talks about it....?

Thanks!

CArl

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The vast majority are sweated on, I've only seen one done by inletting.  That said, they're pretty rare to begin with.  

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Thanks Alan. Might the procedure be to tin the inside of the strip and the spine, assemble and heat? I guess keeping the edge in water to keep it cool? It just occured to me that if your back was soft enough you could drill and tap a few screws vertically down into the blade, a couple threads and turn the threads off the part that sticks out and use those as rivets, through the spine of the spine as it were. A thousand ways to kin a scat.

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That's it exactly, tin the strip (and the spine if you want), assemble and heat the blade with the edge in water until you see the solder flash.  Scrape off any excess, and you're done!  It won't take much at all.  As in, tin the strip and wipe it out with a Q-tip while it's still liquid.  A thin film is all you need if you have good contact.

Brass screws would work, as would blind rivets in an inverted cone-shaped hole, a mini-foxtail wedge, a side-to-side through-rivet, whatever works.  Even (gasp!) epoxy or a structural adhesive like Loctite speedbonder 330.  If it holds your rearview mirror on for 40 years at a time it's pretty good stuff...

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Before you apply the heat, take some white out and paint the blade at the edge of the Brass along the entire length, This will keep the solder from running onto the blade. It just washes off with acetone afterwards.

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The idea, supposedly, is to use the soft brass to catch the edge of your opponent's blade.  How this helps you with a bowie is questionable, since your other hand is probably empty.  They first show up on Scottish dirks, and the idea there is you have a shield with a big spike in the middle that you use to deflate your opponent.  

The usual place they appear is on reproductions of the Musso bowie, the only bowie I know of that had it.  It took all Chuck Burrows could do to convince me it's real.  I've seen two dirks that have one.  

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23 hours ago, Alan Longmire said:

The idea, supposedly, is to use the soft brass to catch the edge of your opponent's blade.  How this helps you with a bowie is questionable, since your other hand is probably empty.  They first show up on Scottish dirks, and the idea there is you have a shield with a big spike in the middle that you use to deflate your opponent.  

The usual place they appear is on reproductions of the Musso bowie, the only bowie I know of that had it.  It took all Chuck Burrows could do to convince me it's real.  I've seen two dirks that have one.  

Catching or blocking a blade on the spine of a knife seems to be an awkward technique. If you're holding the spine indexed toward yourself you would have to bring your hand all the way across your body to have the spine exposed. But I guess the strip overlaps the sides of the spine so you could catch your opponent's edge with a little angle of your knife as you backhand parry or something?

At least they look nice sometimes

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The whole idea of parrying a knife with a knife strikes me as unlikely.  Even the HEMA sword and dagger fencers use the dagger either to catch a bound blade, or as a secondary attack or parry on closing.  Knife fighting is too fast, IMHO, to count on being able to parry, blade to blade.

 

Geoff

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That is a strange link!! IMHO

 

 

Edited by C Craft

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Looks like it didn't keep the Dagger section expanded.  Gotta click that to see the historical images on dagger instruction.  

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A long time ago a bladesmith had a really nice knife in the works, and then goofed at the very end causing a big flaw along the spine.

"Dang!' thought the Smith as he pondered how to save the piece.

"I know" he said.  I'll put a decorative brass element along the spine to cover up the flaw.

Then again, maybe there was a real reason...

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11 minutes ago, Brian Dougherty said:

A long time ago a bladesmith had a really nice knife in the works, and then goofed at the very end causing a big flaw along the spine.

"Dang!' thought the Smith as he pondered how to save the piece.

"I know" he said.  I'll put a decorative brass element along the spine to cover up the flaw.

Then again, maybe there was a real reason...

I believe we have a winner! :lol:

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On 9/4/2019 at 8:32 PM, Jerrod Miller said:

Typically you would parry the arm, not the blade.  https://wiktenauer.com/wiki/Nuremberg_Group

Not sure about this image...

73C44879-2CB8-483E-AAC9-36E46060911E.jpeg

Is this what happens if you lose?

Edited by Charles du Preez
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My fencing coach never taught me that parry.  I suspect that particular technique was forgotten because it generally sucked.

  • Haha 6

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That's what's called a surprise blow...

Maybe he's actually planning for a WWE move, like picking him up and throwing him backwards, or a takedown... But where's that dudes pants? 

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2 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

That's what's called a surprise blow...

Maybe he's actually planning for a WWE move, like picking him up and throwing him backwards, or a takedown... But where's that dudes pants? 

Pants colored ink wasn't invented yet. We're just supposed to imagine pants

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They really weren't great at drawing things in perspective.  Though you can tell his pants and the opponent's shirt used to be pink/red.  A few hundred years worth of ink fading going on.  It is rather surprising how many sword techniques finish with something along the lines of "then move into wrestling to finish him".  In this case he is indeed supposed to throw him (either a tackle or suplex), as described in the text accompanying the image.  

 A good device for a strong man. When you bind with someone upon the sword. Act as if you wish to wind into his face and shove firmly with your cross upon his sword and raise high and allow your sword to fall over your head and fall to him below around both feet, as is pictured here. Thus, you throw him.  

In short:  Blame the illustrator, not the instructor.  ;)

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Ha! That’s great stuff.

On 9/7/2019 at 4:07 PM, Brian Dougherty said:

 I suspect that particular technique was forgotten because it generally sucked.

 

15 hours ago, Zeb Camper said:

That's what's called a surprise blow...

 

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