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WIP German Fechtfeder


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Since I started training with two-handed swords recently, I had to start a new project right away: A proper Fechtfeder. Everything on the market is made for abuse and a low price and therefore not even close to a desired handling characteristic.

 

The original that inspired me was a practice sword by Ulrich Diefstetter from the MET. The blade is modeled after 3D scans of extant Feders from Belgium. Here is how it should look finally (minus the blade etching and a simpler crossguard decoration for this first take) :

MET_Feder_SW.jpg

 

Blade cut and roughly ground, Crossguard in rough finish and a slab of wood for the grip:

P1080023.JPG

 

Matching up the crossguard:

P1080024.JPG

 

Detailing the quillon block:

P1080025.JPG

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  • 3 weeks later...

Short update: Blade finished to 80grit, grip formed and bound with hemp yarn (I will never do one without again, the possibility of breakage by the vibrations and movements of the long tang is too high).  Again: the major work are the fullers in the Schilt (wide part at the base of the blade) done with half-round files and sandpaper on steel cylinders. It's time to get the 4" and 6" grinding wheels for the belt grinder ready... ^_^

 

P1080026.JPG

P1080027.JPG

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I second that! 

 

Binding the grip is interesting. I never would have considered that. A handy piece of information for an aspiring swordsmith like myself!

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Peter Johnsson showed how he does his grips at Owen Bush's hammer-in in 2010, and also in this thread:

Binding is an essential part of the process.   By doing the grip as a glued composite of wood, cordage, and leather you get a nigh-indestructible yet flexible grip that can be removed by a soak in water after you remove the preserving oils.  Well, if you do the wooden core as burnt-in one-piece or didn't use hide glue on the wooden core you'll still have to break the wood off, but the hide glue to consolidate the cordage and the leather is key.  And no sewing is required!  If you look at surviving medieval and Renaissance swords with leather-over-wood grips, you will not see a sewn seam except on late-19th early-20th century replacement grips.   This technique is that good!  I've used it on a few swords and daggers and have been very impressed at how tough a grip it makes.  

Emiliano went one step further on a scabbard he did a few years ago, wrapping thin wood veneer with linen strips soaked in hide glue.  This was based on historical accounts as well as depictions in art, and by golly that was one tough, strong, and lightweight scabbard!  The technique is similar to paper mache.  

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Very interesting! I will have to give that technique a try sometime. 

 

Thanks, as always, for the knowledge, Alan. Its appreciated. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Finally, finished! The handling is beatiful and as it's intended to be a practical sparring and tournament Feder, the decoration is ok-ish for the time spent. However, a nice deep relief cutting would  lift it to another level... (next time!!)

 

Feder_Gehiltz.jpgFeder_Gehiltz1.jpgFeder_Knauf.jpgFeder_Knauf1.jpg

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Some day I hope to get to the level of your "ok-ish".  I like the subtle heavier secondary cord wrap to give the grip better texture, nicely done.

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