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5.5" Petty in 26c3 Edit: finished pair


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A special thanks To @JeffM for the free stabilized walnut! He would not even let me pay for shipping. Bolster is micarta and liners are g10. I profiled three of these and this is the first completed. The customer also commissioned a 8.5" chef which is underway and I'm going to update this post with it later. 

It's made out of 0.078" 26c3 stock. My Rockwell tester did read between 63 and 64hrc. I normally would not go that high but this steel remains tough enough, even at 65. It has the finest edge I achieved so far. 

 

Edit: I added it's bigger brother.

It's got a 8.5" 80CrV2 blade at 61-62hrc. Handle is stabilized spalted hackberry, micarta and vulcanized spacers. 

 

 

 

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Edited by Joël Mercier
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Nice!  I had to look up 26c3.  Sounds like good stuff.  I am surprised Larrin did not mention the silicon addition, it has almost as much as 9260.  That is why it's so tough.  From the description, it also sounds like you could maybe get hamon if you really wanted.  Maybe not as flashy as with W-2, but might be worth an experiment...

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Thanks Alan! But I think there may be a mistake, this steel has between 0.2-0.3% silicon. It's toughness is credited to it's supposedly extremely low impurity level, much like Hitachi steel. 

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This is cleanly and attractively done Joël, I really really like it.  Like Alan, I had to look up that steel as well.  1.3% carbon makes for a knife that gets hard as woodpecker lips.  According to AKS, under ideal quench conditions, it would come out at 68 HRC.  What did you temper it back to?

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2 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

This is cleanly and attractively done Joël, I really really like it.  Like Alan, I had to look up that steel as well.  1.3% carbon makes for a knife that gets hard as woodpecker lips.  According to AKS, under ideal quench conditions, it would come out at 68 HRC.  What did you temper it back to?

Thank you Wes! :)

Luckily, I got my hands on a Rockwell tester a little while back. So I tested this steel and got 67-68 as quenched and 63-64 when tempered at 375°f. Those numbers are pretty much exactly as advertised. On top of hardness, there's also a fair amount of cementite because of all this carbon so it was a pain to hand sand. I'm expecting better edge holding than 80CrV2 though...

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Another nice one, Joel. I feel like it's always said (because it's always true) but your mustard finishes are outstanding. 

I really like that walnut. Good looking stuff. 

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Thanks Will! For some reason(probably intense ambient light), the patina appears in the photos lighter than it really is. It really came out dark and I heard this steel etches real dark with ferric as well.

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33 minutes ago, Joël Mercier said:

Luckily, I got my hands on a Rockwell tester a little while back

I’ve been thinking about those, are they bank breakingly expensive? 

 

Great looking knife!

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4 minutes ago, Conner Michaux said:

I’ve been thinking about those, are they bank breakingly expensive? 

Mine costed me a hornless anvil in an exchange with a fellow bladesmith. It's a superficial Rockwell tester that requires, unsurprisingly, a special diamond indenter in order to be accurate. I got real lucky and found one in good condition on eBay. Those indenters can go as high as $600 when bought new. I paid $35 :lol:

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Another thing to consider with a Rockwell tester is do you have an environment to set one up in.  It has to be clean and temperature regulated.  One of the portable units might do  you well but make sure that it can measure hardness in something as thin as a knife blade.  Also remember that  you need to measure across parallel sides.

Doug

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@Joël Mercier Indeed an edge that looks good and will feel good as well- a question from an aspiring wannabee about the petty- How thin do you take the edge pre HT and is there a secondary bevel added after HT?

Once again- beautiful- Bravo

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1 hour ago, Kerri Duncan said:

@Joël Mercier Indeed an edge that looks good and will feel good as well- a question from an aspiring wannabee about the petty- How thin do you take the edge pre HT and is there a secondary bevel added after HT?

Once again- beautiful- Bravo

Thanks Kerri!

It really is up to you. When I work with thin stock, 0.078" is this case, I quench it at full thickness and grind my bevels after the temper. It's harder on belts but greatly reduces the risk of warping during the quench. When I use thicker stock, like 1/8" and up, I grind some before quenching.

I assume the secondary bevel you speak of is the edge itself. If so, it is done at the very end of the making process. On kitchen knives I generally grind my primary bevel to around 0.005' at edge. The hand sanding generally removes around 0.002" total so I end up with a pretty thin edge. But it really is up to you and the desired purpose of the knife. You will want a boning knife thicker at edge than a nakiris...

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16 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

... So I tested this steel and got 67-68 as quenched and 63-64 when tempered at 375°f. Those numbers are pretty much exactly as advertised....

That has to make you feel good about both your process and your tester :)

Great looking knife.  Does that steel behave any different when doing your mustard patina?

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2 hours ago, JeffM said:

Beautiful looking knives you have got there Joel....nice to see those walnut scales worked out well for you...

Hey thanks again Jeff!

 

2 hours ago, Brian Dougherty said:

That has to make you feel good about both your process and your tester :)

Great looking knife.  Does that steel behave any different when doing your mustard patina?

It does indeed!

I didn't notice anything different with the patina else than being a bit darker than usual. It doesn't show in the pics because I took them in daylight with lots of ambient light. I am also a poor photographer :lol:span widget

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

I assume the secondary bevel you speak of is the edge itself. If so, it is done at the very end of the making process. On kitchen knives I generally grind my primary bevel to around 0.005' at edge. The hand sanding generally removes around 0.002" total so I end up with a pretty thin edge. But it really is up to you and the desired purpose of the knife. You will want a boning knife thicker at edge than a nakiris...

Understood- I am going to have to learn Japanese to make sense of the eastern styles vs the western... And thank you for the reply!

Kerri

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On 9/29/2019 at 5:36 PM, Joël Mercier said:

Thank you Wes! :)

Luckily, I got my hands on a Rockwell tester a little while back. So I tested this steel and got 67-68 as quenched and 63-64 when tempered at 375°f. Those numbers are pretty much exactly as advertised. On top of hardness, there's also a fair amount of cementite because of all this carbon so it was a pain to hand sand. I'm expecting better edge holding than 80CrV2 though...

Good lord dude, sharpening that thing on a stone is not going to be a good time.  But you heat treat is solid as hell man!  The fact that you are getting that hardness straight out of quench means your routine is pretty much ideal.  Cheers!

Edited by Wes Detrick
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9 hours ago, Wes Detrick said:

sharpening that thing on a stone is not going to be a good time

I've got a set of Shapton GlassStones which are made out of ceramic and they cut surprisingly fast. One thing I noticed, though, is that the edge did not form the usual burr when setting the bevels.  

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4 hours ago, Joël Mercier said:

I've got a set of Shapton GlassStones which are made out of ceramic and they cut surprisingly fast. One thing I noticed, though, is that the edge did not form the usual burr when setting the bevels.  

That's interesting.  Do you think it is because the hardness is to high to allow a bur to "flop" back and forth, or is it the makeup of the steel that doesn't form one?

I'd be lost if I didn't have a bur to go by as it is the thing I rely on to know if I an truly done bringing the bevel down to an edge.

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