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I Cut My Way - to restore or not


Cason Hicks

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I think that you would have to grind out too much steel to get rid of all that corrosion.  You would be re-profiling the whole blade.

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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maybe you could remove the rust and just put on an edge?
if the edge goes below the bolster, you could grind the bolster down to make it look to form XD
the worst seems to be at the tip and that you could fix but it would make the knife shorter.
definitely a job for whetstones tho.

I mean...anythings better than leaving it to die, right? D":

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I'd just oil it and leave it as-is.  It's a mid-twentieth century knife that isn't worth much monetarily, so the sentimental value is it's main reason for existing. The aluminum pommel and fiber spacers plus the rivets in the sheath put it firmly in the 1930s-1960s range.   In mint condition it'd be maybe $150.  An old, well-respected name, owned by conglomerates since 1852.  I have a few of their Swiss Army-style folders from the 1970s, named after the various royal regimental guards.  Nifty, but not worth much cash-wise.

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Definitely too deep to save without doing some legitimate grinding. 

It could be saved, but it wont be the same knife when your finished. I would also just oil it and leave it. 

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Sometimes an old object tells a story of the “life” it’s had and the times it’s seen. Restoring it will destroy that. I would vote for preservation by cleaning it up, stabilising everything and the perhaps a coat of renaissance wax to preserve it. On that note @Alan Longmire. What is the best thing to moisturise and preserve old leather and old wood with?

"The way we win matters" (Ender Wiggins) Orson Scott Card

 

Nos qui libertate donati nescimus quid constat

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For practical purposes, there's a product for leather called Lexol that is pretty good.  For wood, oils or waxes are good, but anything you use will darken it.  Museums use thinned polyvinyl alcohol to consolidate and preserve organics.  Think clear Elmer's glue.  It's great for things that will not be moved, and it's completely reversable.  

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Thanks Alan

"The way we win matters" (Ender Wiggins) Orson Scott Card

 

Nos qui libertate donati nescimus quid constat

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