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Hey everyone I'm new here, and just getting into the craft. I acquired an anvil from a generous person who gave it to me as long as I forge him something. Obviously I graciously agreed to do so. There is no visible marks to identify it other 0 3 5. I understand that is how to determine it's weight. I've exhausted all my online resources to attempt to identify this anvil. Closest thing it resembles is a Alsop Anvil? Anyway I'm hoping someone can help me here.

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Alan will have to weigh in, but I'd say, English, pre 1810.  Short heel and no pritchel hole lead me there.  The 0 3 5 is the weight in 100 weight or CWT, it should be about 89 lbs or 40 kilos.

It's pretty clean little guy, and once you get attached to the stump, it should work very well.  Nice gift.


Geoff

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Geoff is right.  The numbers read 89 pounds, and with the lack of a pritchel hole (pre-1830-ish) and the longer horn with table (post 1790-ish) 1810 is as good an estimate as any.  It is English, made in the "Black Country" area of the west Midlands.  There were over 200 anvil makers in that area at the time, most of whom did not mark their work.  

It's wrought iron with a steel face, which looks to be in great shape.  Looks like someone hit it with a belt sander, which is more than I'd recommend doing to it, but the full 1/2" thickness of the face looks to be there.  The reason you do not grind on the face of these old ones is that the full hardness of the face is only about 1/16" deep.  If you grind past the hard part, you've got an anvil-shaped object.  

That was a generous gift!  These old English ones with the mass under the face work like a much heaver modern anvil with their long heels and horns.  Use it well.

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Thank you so much both of you. I appreciate all the input. I can stop wondering and use it well. I will refrain from taking a belt sander to the face. It's flat enough and free of too many tool marks. So stoked I got this, I was striking out finding an anvil in my budget.

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1 hour ago, Alan Longmire said:

Geoff is right.  The numbers read 89 pounds, and with the lack of a pritchel hole (pre-1830-ish) and the longer horn with table (post 1790-ish) 1810 is as good an estimate as any.  It is English, made in the "Black Country" area of the west Midlands.  There were over 200 anvil makers in that area at the time, most of whom did not mark their work.  

It's wrought iron with a steel face, which looks to be in great shape.  Looks like someone hit it with a belt sander, which is more than I'd recommend doing to it, but the full 1/2" thickness of the face looks to be there.  The reason you do not grind on the face of these old ones is that the full hardness of the face is only about 1/16" deep.  If you grind past the hard part, you've got an anvil-shaped object.  

That was a generous gift!  These old English ones with the mass under the face work like a much heaver modern anvil with their long heels and horns.  Use it well.

I also live in upstate NY where several battles of the revolutionary war took place. So I can surmise the anvil was brought here by first settlers of the area. It was located near Lake Champlain just south of the Canadian border.  The things this anvil has been witness to is unimaginable.

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Yeah, you never know what that anvil may have seen and done.  It would be cool as heck to work on :)

 

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