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I found an old chain link a wile back. I cut it most of the way through and bent it until it came of, is this what wrought iron looks like?  

image.jpg

I think that’s what I’m looking for, the grains of metal I’m those thin strands. 

Edited by Conner Michaux
I can’t spell for my life

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here is the piece I ripped it off of 

image.jpg

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Hard to tell by my eye.  I've not run across any wrought in my life time.    Try etching it in ferric if you got it.  I believe wrought shows black streaks where the silicone slag is left over.   Also, I think if you forge it wrought tends to break apart into those strands.   Need to forge weld it back really hot.

 

I need to find me some wrought iron...

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Yep, that looks like it might be really clean wrought.  If so, score!  Work it hot, never cooler than bright orange.  

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Sweet, I’m going to go etch it and see what it looks like. 

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This is pretty cool

 

89B908AC-FF5D-4C10-8BA4-F291C20FA730.jpeg

537ACCD5-B39E-445A-893C-A368B6ACAE16.jpeg

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Here it is, definitely not steel. Very cool pattern going on in there 

 

image.jpg

Edited by Conner Michaux
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Yes indeed, that's the good stuff!  Chain is usually very clean and well-refined.  Usually. :lol:  Seems like every time I have a commission for a historic repro hawk using iron, I test a chain link and it comes up gorgeous.  So I use it, and in the final finish sanding or engraving a giant inclusion shows up.  If it's not a commission, it's perfect.  

 

Remember, work it HOT!  Far hotter than you would steel.  And be prepared for it to forge like play-doh.  If you get ambitious and try san-mai or the one-sided laminate thing, remember to use less iron than steel.  The iron will smoosh out and cover the steel before you know it.  Not a problem in damascus.  

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I was thinking of Trying to laminate one side of a piece of Damascus.   Not yet though.  

 

 

I want to forge a kiridashi, I have a small piece of Damascus that is the perfect size. I was thinking maybe I could draw out a small piece of the wrought and weld it to the side of the Damascus.  Then I could forge it out into the knife. 

Edited by Conner Michaux

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Know if you do the one-sided laminate it will warp dramatically towards the iron side when quenched.  The traditional way to fix this is to warm the blade to around 300 degrees and gently hammer on the iron side, evenly from tang to tip, until it's straight. This will clinch your sphincter!

 

Also note that's just for thin knives.  A kiridashi will be fine. 

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Alright, I’m going to save the wrought for later, I’ll forge weld it to some mono steel. I don’t want to end up burning or melting the damascus during the forge welding.  So I’ll make a Damascus blade tomorrow. I don’t have much wrought either, so I want to use it when I have some more knowledge on forge welding. 

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