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Jeremy Blohm

Wrought iron axe

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Should I weld on a steel poll on the back side or leave it as wrought iron? I really don't plan on hammering on/with it.

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I wouldn't bother. 

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looks really good, fold went really well. That is going to be a nice little axe.

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Its heat treated and ready for the grind and then THE ETCH!!!!  I cant wait to see it after its etched. I'm really really excited about it!!!

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Think I'm as excited as you, Jeremy.  I've been watching this thread closely.  You've done a good job on this one.  Can't wait to see it all finished and handled.

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It's in the etch now....It looks incredible!!!!!!!

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Part 4 of the videos 

 

 

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Enjoyed the video, Jeremy.  That wrought iron makes for a very interesting pattern, to say the least.

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It turned out really, really nice!  I love the grain of the WI and the overall shape is well done.

 

All this talk and work with WI has made me want to work WI even more.

 

Does anyone know a good source to buy it from?  I have no place (that I know) to scrounge around for WI so buying it seems like the best shot and ebay seems iffy.

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Thank you....I could have etched it a little more but I figured what its going to be used for I will end up re-handling it and etching again.

 

Here is a site that recycles wrought and sells it. I've never bought from them as I've gotten pretty good at spotting it and buying it from the scrap yard or from auctions.

 

https://www.realwroughtiron.com/

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It has a little surface rust on if from people trying to finger the pattern but that won't affect the way it chops wood.;)

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Edited by Jeremy Blohm
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Thank you Alan!!!! It was an extremely fun project....I hope it serves me well for many years to come.

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I like that pattern.  Is that just something wrought has without stacking and all that other stuff that pattern welding accomplishs?

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1 hour ago, Chris Christenberry said:

I like that pattern.  Is that just something wrought has without stacking and all that other stuff that pattern welding accomplishs?

 

Yep.  Wrought iron is the original composite material.  It's made from nearly pure iron shot through with iron silicate slag fibers.  The original method (bloomery forge) did this naturally.  After full industrialization came in, they would replicate it by tossing a cast iron billet (a "pig") into a reverberatory furnace full of molten slag and raking it around until it was both decarburized and was thoroughly mixed with the slag.  This process was called "puddling."  The resulting ball (also called a bloom) then got squished, rolled, and forged to remove most of the slag and to make sure the iron fibers were all running in the same direction.  I left out about fifty different stages of refinement in the process that took place between around 500 BC and 1854 AD, but you get the idea.  All that processing is what makes the pattern, just like pattern welding.  To make it even more fun, wrought will etch different colors depending on the phosphorus and manganese content.  it has a color range from pure silver to black, with every shade of gray in between.

 

The last wrought iron to be industrially produced was in the late 1950s in England, in a puddling mill near Birmingham, unless the Soviets were making it as well.  I have no idea if they ever did.  The last U.S. wrought was made around 1935.  Today if you want some you have to find old scrap or make it yourself via the bloomery process.  

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On 11/30/2019 at 1:06 PM, Alan Longmire said:

Today if you want some you have to find old scrap or make it yourself via the bloomery process.

Or buy some recycled material from someone like these guys:

https://www.realwroughtiron.com/

 

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